Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Fashion Technology’

Infographic Alert: Multichannel Marketing Can Be Puzzling

November 2, 2013 Leave a comment

 etail-west

November 1, 2013 -

by Elyse Dupre and James Jarnot

Creating optimal customer experiences is a top priority for many retailers. In fact, 65% of retail executives polled say providing the best customer experience possible is the most important factor when obtaining approval for sales and marketing technology investments, according to the “Breaking Through Customer Engagement Barriers with Innovative Marketing and Technologies” report by Infogroup Targeting Solutions and Retail Touchpoints. And the best customer experiences are those that are relevant—powered by multichannel customer data and messaging.

However, piecing this multichannel data together can leave marketers feeling puzzled. According to the report, 47% of retail executives rank “using their existing customer data effectively,” as their greatest marketing challenge, followed by “integrating social and mobile data” (18%), “using analytics” (11%), and “integrating new data” (8%).

When it comes to completing the overall picture of the customer, a majority of marketers (58%) agree that transactional and purchase history information are the most valuable types of data, the report notes. Following far behind in importance are behavioral and attitudinal data (14%) and demographic data (14%). Just 5% of respondents say social media data is the most valuable, and only 2% list Web browsing history data as important, according to the report. This lack of emphasis on key areas of customer data may leave puzzling gaps in insight.

Real-time data also proves to be a brain twister. The report cites that less than a quarter of respondents (23%) use real-time data to generate customer offers frequently and less than one third (30%) admit to doing so infrequently. In fact, 11% say they don’t use real-time data to produce customer offers at all. However, 36% say they would like to do so in the future.

But piecing together multichannel data isn’t the only thing retailers are stumped on. They also struggle with multichannel messaging. According to the report, only 37% of retail executives provide consistent marketing messages across all channels. Of the remaining 63%, 50% say they synchronize their messaging across some channels, but not all, and 13% say they treat each channel separately.

InfographicWeekly082313

Elyse Dupre is a reporter at Direct Marketing News and covers ever-evolving trends in the marketing world.James Jarnot is the Art Director at Direct Marketing News.

CLO3D Student Virtual Fashion Collection Projects

 

The student projects posted here represent an optional CLO3D project that was part of a 4 week CLO3D module that was part of an Adobe FashionCAD class. No garment pattern skills or pattern making prerequisites are required for this class. Some apparel design and product development students are mixed in with fashion merchandising, fashion/textile design technology.

CLO3D was used exclusively as a fashion product visualization tool to view the 2D fashion product line concepts they created earlier in the semester in a 3D environment.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The specific challenge for this optional project was to develop CLO3D virtual representations [6] to match a previous 2D fashion product development class assignment that included concept,description, color, fabric, print pattern and line boards. They were to develop the garments , create CLO3D layouts illustrating different viewpoints and a CLO3D animation for each garment.

Examples of other  student virtual fashion collection projects:

Cara Walsemann: The Flow of Nature Collection

Ebenezer Baawuah: Earthlistic Collection

Previous CLO3D post: CLO3D Student Virtual Fashion Concept Visualization Project

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

CLO3D Student Virtual Fashion Concept Visualization Project

The video above is an example of Introduction to CLO3D to a FashionCAD class that focuses on developing  intermediate Adobe skills for the Fashion Industry. Each semester we try to include one big final project that has the potential to incorporate some of the previous skills as well as introduce a 3D working environment to students. The students in this class are not exclusively apparel design students. Some apparel design and product development students are mixed in with fashion merchandising, fashion/textile design technology. No garment pattern skills or background are required for this class.

The video below has additional submissions.

Introducing CLO3D was an experiment conducted to determine how user-friendly and easy CLO3D would be in a general fashion Adobe design product development class as a fashion product visualization tool. The results were outstanding.  The videos posted are the result of the very first CLO3D class assignments. Each student watched the CLO3D  intro video tutorials and they were each assigned to develop 3 garments. They were to use fashion colors developed in class and if they used print patterns – they should be the ones developed earlier in class.

These first assignment videos illustrate partial results from the class.

Once the students familiarized themselves with the basic functions they began to really see the creative development possibilities and really began to enjoy working in CLO3D. This was a user-friendly application that they could use to quickly visualize their fashion product concept.

CLO3D was not used as a garment pattern making tool in this class – it was used exclusively as a fashion product visualization tool to view their 2D fashion concepts in a 3D environment. The time alloted for the CLO3D project was the last 4 weeks out of a 15 week semester.

The students were then challenged to an optional project to develop CLO3D virtual representations [6] to match a previous fashion product development class assignment that included concept,description, color, fabric, print pattern and line boards. Future posts will illustrate some of the student submissions.

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

Digital Fabric Design: Creative & Technical Exploration

Using CLO3D to visualize engineered garments

This post summarizes a customized undergraduate student project that incorporated an exploration into and experimental development of vector based surface design graphics. The new methods explored by the student were non-repeat yardage & engineered garment design.

The aesthetic goal of this project is to capture the essence of Hawaii. Water life, flora, and volcanoes of Hawaii are incorporated into the surface designs. Research was conducted to integrate the surface theme with the traditional sarong garment styling as well as develop engineered garments inspired by the sarong.

Faith Scheffer Moeuhane-Fabric-Design-II

The challenge was to first conduct a variety of research then develop a Hawaiian theme that is integrated with current color and print trends. A new method of print design for the student involved four very large lengths of silk fabric (four sarongs)  that did not contain a repeat. Another challenge was to explore and develop custom engineered prints for garment pattern design and construction. Garment patterns were traditionally developed and digitized into the OptTtex application. From there they were exported and then imported into Adobe Illustrator where the surface graphics were added. CLO3D was used as a 3D visualization aid for viewing surface graphic design placement.

Vector based applications are perfect for creation of either large width/length pieces of yardage or for developing graphics for full-scale garment patterns because vector files are resolution free thus the file sizes are manageable as compared to raster files. Vector files can be easily exported as a raster of any quality.

The wide scale  (42″ by 72″) fabric non-repeat design was easily created by the student in Adobe Illustrator. The silk fabric yardage was printed at Inkdrop Printing. Garment patterns for this project were  created using the traditional methods of flat patternmaking and then patterns are digitized into the computer. The full-scale garment patterns were then imported into Adobe Illustrator and surface designs were created directly onto the garments patterns. 3D visualization helps with design development. Fabric was digitally printed with the digitally embellished surface patterns at Spoonflower. The two garments are then constructed.

The resulting Moe’uhane, (which means “dream” in Hawaiian) collection consists of four sarong yardages and two Hawaiian-inspired garments. They were recently presented publicly at the BSCRUNWAY 5.0 annual fashion event sponsored by the Fashion and Textile Technology Program at Buffalo State College, USA.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Link to Faith Scheffer student designer interview

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

Behind the Scenes of Flamingo PAU with KadesMode

Videographer: Alexandersvisions.com
Designer: Elaine Polvinen
Photographer: Bruce Fox
http://www.kadesmode.com/

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua VII

- Summary

Flamingo Pua Collection

The Flamingo Pua project involved the design, development and creation of prototypes of a collection of 6 garments from initial concept to virtual to real garment prototypes.

The use of 2D and 3D applications throughout enables very quick response design development. This project took approximately 3 weeks from start to finish. Applications used were Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator, OptiTex, and CLO 3D.

Photoshop was used to develop the initial concept board, Illustrator was used to develop print pattern repeats and create the garment basic silhouettes, silhouettes with print patterns and all full size garment pattern surface design and graphics.

OptiTex is a very easy to use multi-dimensional application. For this project it was used for garment pattern development, initial 3D garment testing before and after graphics were applied, and export of garment patterns to Illustrator.

CLO3D was used to develop Animations for the virtual fashion show and the four-way layouts.

The four-way static posed layouts could also easily be generated in the OptiTex application.

Other product development steps you would need to complete if you were ever planning on some sort of limited production would be to create a specification pack [spec pack or tech pack] that included all detailed  garment measurements for each size you are planning to order the garment in and every single other material [fashion fabric/lining, interfacing], notion and embellishment needed to reconstruct the garment. Last but not least by any means would be to put together a costing sheet that includes all costs associated with producing the item. I will put together a follow-up post in near future.

Hope you enjoyed the series.

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

Previous posts:

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua VI: – Runway

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua V: – digital fabric printing of engineered garment pattern prototypes.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua IV: CLO3D virtual fashion show

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua III: garment pattern development in OptiTex, garment sketch development, engineered garment pattern surface design development, OptiTex 3D simulation test.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua II: color palette, print pattern and garment sketch development.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua I: inspiration, initial research for concept & silhouette development

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua VI

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

A very special thank you to Kristina, Kadejah and Ashley.

BSCRUNWAY 5.0 was held at Pierce Arrow Building on Saturday April 21st at 3 and 8pm. Here is a link to the BSCRUNWAY FACEBOOK page and the BSCRUNWAY blog.

 

The Flamingo Pua collection was in Runway 5.0. Video of the entire show will soon be on the Buffalo State YouTube site and a video clip of just the Flamingo Pua collection will be posted here when it is ready.

  • Nate Benson Photo links for Runway 5.0 here.
  • Eric Winton Photography Runway 5.0 link here.
  • Buffalo.com photo links for Runway 5.0 here.

Next Post: 2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua VII: Summary

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

Previous posts:

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua V: – digital fabric printing of engineered garment pattern prototypes.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua IV: CLO3D virtual fashion show

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua III: garment pattern development in OptiTex, garment sketch development, engineered garment pattern surface design development, OptiTex 3D simulation test.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua II: color palette, print pattern and garment sketch development.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua I: inspiration, initial research for concept & silhouette development

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua V

- digital fabric printing of engineered garment pattern prototypes.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The Engineered Garment Pattern Prototype Printing Process

The process used for the non-permanent digital textile printing was just an ordinary 42 inch wide HP designjet inkjet printer.

If you would like to send out for a more permanent digital textile printing process there is Inkdrop Printing , First2print , Spoonflower, Fabric on Demand or Karma Kraft.

Here is a link to an interesting article on Spoonflower titled “Made in the Carolinas.”

We did not have time to send these files out for a more permanent printing procedure as the entire process from  virtual start to real world and ready for Runway finish for the 6 garments was three weeks and we do not have a more permanent digital printing system on campus.  Since the garment pattern pieces were printed inside the cut line – it was quite simple to cut out the individual pattern pieces from the printed fabric. The fabric was paper-backed so the paper was pulled off. The 100% cotton jersey was then stabilized with some iron on fusible knit interfacing. The garments were constructed fast because, structurally they were very simple.

The next step was to prepare for the Runway event.

Next post: 2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua VI: Runway

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

Previous posts:

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua IV: CLO3D virtual fashion show

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua III: garment pattern development in OptiTex, garment sketch development, engineered garment pattern surface design development, OptiTex 3D simulation test.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua II: color palette, print pattern and garment sketch development.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua I: inspiration, initial research for concept & silhouette development

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua IV

- CLO3D virtual fashion show

CLO3D was the application used to create a virtual fashion show for the Flamingo Pua series. I will have more posts in the near future relating to integration  testing of the CLO3D application in an educational setting for specialized use as a fashion product visualization tool as well as a student project that included the use of the CLO3D application.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Next post: 2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua V: digital fabric printing of engineered garment pattern prototypes

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

Previous posts:

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua III: garment pattern development in OptiTex,  garment sketch development, engineered garment pattern surface design development, OptiTex 3D simulation test.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua II: color palette, print pattern and garment sketch development.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua I:  inspiration, initial research for concept & silhouette development

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua III

- Garment pattern development in OptiTex,  garment sketch development, engineered garment pattern surface design development, OptiTex 3D simulation test.

palette, print pattern and garment sketch development.

Garment patterns were quickly developed and simulations were visualized using OptiTex PDS.

Ideas for graphics were added to basic silhouette sketches (above) and used as a guide to develop final surface patterns/graphics (below).

Garment patterns were exported from OptiTex and imported into Adobe Illustrator full size (above).  All garment pattern lines were set to invisible except perimeter cut lines. Graphics and surface patterns were developed inside the cut lines for each full size garment pattern piece.

Engineered garment surface patterns were tested in the OptiTex PDS 3D application (above).

Next post: 2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua IV : Clo3D – virtual fashion show

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

Previous posts:

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua II: color palette, print pattern and garment sketch development.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua I: inspiration, initial research for concept & silhouette development

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua II

– color palette, print pattern and garment sketch development.

 

Color palette, print pattern and garment sketch development Color, styling and silhouette direction were researched using WGSN (Worth Global Styling Network). It is the leading online global trend and sourcing network.

“WGSN is the leading online trend-analysis and research service providing creative and business intelligence for the apparel, style, design and retail industries.” History of WGSN

All WGSN reports are downloadable and fully editable. My favorite category is Design and product Development –   inspiration, influences  research color key items, silhouette, styling and graphics 2 years in advance for every fashion category you can think of.

Pasted blow are the color and print patterns developed for the Flamingo Pua series.

Pasted below are the basic garment silhouette shapes developed for the Flamingo Pua series.

Next Post: 2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua III – Garment pattern development & engineered garment pattern surface design development.

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

Previous post: 2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua I : Inspiration, initial research for concept & silhouette development

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua I

This fashion product development product prototype project was specifically developed by Elaine Polvinen, MFA & Dr. Lynn Boorady, Buffalo State College, USA to incorporate a visual exotic Hawaiian theme into a series of real world garments and to experiment and explore integrating multiple 2D and 3D development techniques. Applications used for development of this series were Adobe Creative Suite [Photoshop & Illustrator], OptiTex and CLO3D.

CONCEPT/SILHOUETTE DEVELOPMENT

INSPIRATION

The inspiration for the Flamingo Pua Series is a synthesis of the simplicity and beauty of the anthurium plant. The simplicity of the early Hawaiian holoku and muu’muu garments also provided an additional inspiration for the simple shapes of the 100% cotton jersey garment series.

CONCEPT RESEARCH

The project began with visual research and development of 2D visuals of the anthurium, color, garment silhouette and styling trend research as well as research into the historical  development of the early Hawaiian holoku garment and Hawaiian fashion. According research conducted by Arthur (1997) the hawaiian holoku originated as a loose gown for everyday wear. Her research states twentieth century “Lingerie-style holokeq \o(u,-)  were made in cottons such as muslin, batiste and dimity, and had a straighter silhouette than previously.” The Hawaiian muu’muu was a loose fitting , shorter informal version of the holoku.  The word muu’ muu means “cut off” because it lacked a yoke.

Information about Hawaiian shirts an dresses can be located here and here.

Next post: 2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype flamingo Pua II - color palette, print pattern and garment sketch development.

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

Real and Virtual Buffalo State Loves Cotton Exhibitions

A number of class projects from the Buffalo State College Loves Cotton education grant sponsored by Cotton Inc. have already been completed.

REAL WORLD EXHIBITS
During the summer of 2011 [June & July] a real world exhibit will be on display in the E.H. Butler library on the campus of Buffalo State College. This exhibit will be changing and installed by Dr Lynn Boorady, the project director for this Cotton Inc. education grant. Another real world Buffalo Loves Cotton exhibit is planned for 234 Gallery September 18 – 24, 2011.

VIRTUAL WORLD EXHIBIT

A virtually created exhibition of the Buffalo State Loves Cotton project has been developed by Elaine Polvinen and is currently open on the Buffalo State Island in Second Life. This exhibit will be in place until 12/31/11. You are invited to visit the exhibit in the virtual world of Second Life.

There are several options for you to visit the virtual exhibition. The first option [if you are not already a member of the SL community]  is to download and join Second Life [It’s free to join].

  • Link to What is Second Life HERE .
  •  Link to Download Second Life HERE.  
  • Link to Join Second Life HERE.

Install the Second Life application on your computer. Then go to the link to join Second Life. You first choose an avatar, then register for Second Life [remember it is free to join] and get a user name and password. Once you complete the registration and select and avatar you can open the second life application. You will need to type in your user name and password. The first time you enter the world of Second Life you will experience about a  30 minute self-help tutorial on Orientation Welcome Island  that will guide you through the steps of learning how to communicate, walk, move around [using move tools], camera controls, how to sit, fly, and change you avatars basic appearance. I believe also covers the basics of search, using the map, opening a note card and buying things in Second Life.

Here is a video to show you with the Welcome Orientation island is like HERE

Once you have completed the tutorial you can teleport over to the Buffalo State region by clicking on the SURL.

Clicking on this SLURL [Second Life URL] will take you to the landing location [image on left] on the Buffalo State island.

When you land on the Buffalo State island [sponsored by the Research Foundation] turn around and you will see the posters for the Buffalo Loves Cotton exhibit in the back of the first floor of the Research building. The actual BLC exhibit is up the curved ramp to the second floor.

Here is a link to my slideshow in FLICKR that will familiarize you with the exhibit area before you go.

Another option is only open to educators. If you are an educator and would like to get a virtual tour of the Buffalo Loves Cotton exhibit for your students please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

Buffalo Loves Cotton Texture Gallery for Second Life

Very soon there will be a Buffalo State Loves Cotton virtual exhibition opening in Second Life. All of the final selected Buffalo Loves Cotton seamless textures that were used to create the Fashion Mash Collection for Runway 4.0 are here in this gallery and will also be available at the  exhibition in Second Life [free with all permissions opened] for you to use for your virtual creations.

So you can either right mouse click and copy them from this blog post and upload them for $10L each or you can visit the exhibit when it opens and get them all in world for free. They are all 412 X 512 pixels.

Second Life Buffalo Loves Cotton Project

Buffalo Loves Cotton in Second Life

The spring 2011 FashionCAD class worked on a Buffalo Loves Cotton in Second Life project. This was but one of many class projects for the FashionCAD class and one of multiple Fashion and Textile Technology course projects that are part of the Buffalo State Loves Cotton Inc. Education Grant. Students signed up for Second Life and first learned the basics of moving, flying and communicating before all meeting up on the Buffalo State island in Second Life. [note: The Buffalo State island in Second Life is sponsored by the Research Foundation at Buffalo State College]

Once there they were able to practice snapshots with the poseballs. They familiarized themselves with the Appearance menu to develop clothing inside Second Life before learning how to develop a customized design using a UV map. Their first UV map project students worked on was with a t-shirt using one of their custom designs. Once they became familiar with how a UV map could be used to develop custom garments, they uploaded some of the custom repeat patterns they developed for previous assignments. Their final Second Life project goal was to replicate the Buffalo Loves Cotton garments using surface patterns and garment designs developed by a previous group of students. They used Robin Wood’s Second Life UV maps to draw garments similar to the ones that were developed and constructed for the Runway 4.0 event. Once their Buffalo Loves garments were created they used the poseballs to take snapshots of their avatars [image above].


The conclusion of the Second Life module was a Buffalo Loves Cotton fashion show. Students activated an animation object and practiced walking their avatars before the final video [above] on the runway.

Buffalo Loves Cotton Posts:

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 94 other followers

%d bloggers like this: