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Infographic Alert: Multichannel Marketing Can Be Puzzling

November 2, 2013 Leave a comment

 etail-west

November 1, 2013 -

by Elyse Dupre and James Jarnot

Creating optimal customer experiences is a top priority for many retailers. In fact, 65% of retail executives polled say providing the best customer experience possible is the most important factor when obtaining approval for sales and marketing technology investments, according to the “Breaking Through Customer Engagement Barriers with Innovative Marketing and Technologies” report by Infogroup Targeting Solutions and Retail Touchpoints. And the best customer experiences are those that are relevant—powered by multichannel customer data and messaging.

However, piecing this multichannel data together can leave marketers feeling puzzled. According to the report, 47% of retail executives rank “using their existing customer data effectively,” as their greatest marketing challenge, followed by “integrating social and mobile data” (18%), “using analytics” (11%), and “integrating new data” (8%).

When it comes to completing the overall picture of the customer, a majority of marketers (58%) agree that transactional and purchase history information are the most valuable types of data, the report notes. Following far behind in importance are behavioral and attitudinal data (14%) and demographic data (14%). Just 5% of respondents say social media data is the most valuable, and only 2% list Web browsing history data as important, according to the report. This lack of emphasis on key areas of customer data may leave puzzling gaps in insight.

Real-time data also proves to be a brain twister. The report cites that less than a quarter of respondents (23%) use real-time data to generate customer offers frequently and less than one third (30%) admit to doing so infrequently. In fact, 11% say they don’t use real-time data to produce customer offers at all. However, 36% say they would like to do so in the future.

But piecing together multichannel data isn’t the only thing retailers are stumped on. They also struggle with multichannel messaging. According to the report, only 37% of retail executives provide consistent marketing messages across all channels. Of the remaining 63%, 50% say they synchronize their messaging across some channels, but not all, and 13% say they treat each channel separately.

InfographicWeekly082313

Elyse Dupre is a reporter at Direct Marketing News and covers ever-evolving trends in the marketing world.James Jarnot is the Art Director at Direct Marketing News.

“[TC]2 , Textile Clothing technology Corporation: 3D Body Scanning Technologies

The mission of TC2  is to elevate the level of technology, manufacturing systems, and business processes employed in the global soft goods industry through research and development, education, training, and outreach.  [TC]2 is a provider of direct and indirect technology products and services to industry.

Their Web site offers information on multiple types of body scanners for the global soft goods industry. 3D body scanning is just one research area of [TC]2.

Some end uses for 3D body scanning are: • Health/medical and fitness management • Body shape analysis • Sizing surveys • 3D product development for fashionable and functional apparel • Made-to-measure clothing •  Clothing size and style recommendation • Virtual Fashion

An overview of some of the technologies used in the apparel industry are referenced in this article titled, “Sewn Product Technology.” by Kerry King Director of Product Development and Sustainability Initiatives at [TC]2 , Textile Clothing technology Corporation. According to Sally Aitkin on her Exploring the World of Sustainable Fashion blog article titled ” Innovative Technology–3D Body Scanning.

” The first two scanners were deployed by Levi Strauss and North Carolina State College of Textiles.  They had a footprint of 180 square feet and had a price tag of $200,000.”

The price has been reduced dramatically since then and continues to drop. The current [TC]2 version of the Image Twin full body scanner uses white light and has a 4′ by 5′ footprint and scans in 6 seconds.

Image Twin Full Body Scanner

The  [TC]2 KX-16  [laser] is similar to the [TC]2 NX-16 body scanner [white light] we have at Buffalo State college. We have it linked to the OptiTex application and we can easily create customized body scanned avatars to use directly in the OptiTex garment pattern application. Here is a link to the post: Body Scanning and OptiTex

[TC]²’s scanning technology scans the whole body in seconds and rapidly produces a true-to-scale 3D body model.  The measurement extraction software package features capabilities for Virtual Fashion visualization with links to 3D garment pattern making applications from major industry CAD packages. Just a few end-uses for body scanning are at the beginning of this post. Link to a recent Textile World article: [TC]2 Introduces KX-16 Body Scanner

An email quote from David Brunner [dbruner@tc2.com] Vice-President, Technology Development at [TC]2 states:

Our “16 depth sensor” machine the KX-16  though is overall equal to full body scanners like our own NX-16 or laser scanners, and supports hundreds of measurements with better than 1/4″ accuracy.  In fact, it is better on 8 of 10 technical points of comparison (3X more data, scan any color garment or skin, good hair coverage, faster scan, etc).   It is only $10,000 (portable) or $12,500 in the booth version.  I have attached a picture of the portable version just taken at an installation in Portugal (it can scan in open air with no problems).  The booth version is much like the NX-16 booth.

TC2 Image Twin Single Windows Kinect Body Scanner

TC2 Image Twin Single Windows Kinect Body Scanner Accurate human avatars for all applications including size selection advice, virtual fashion and weight loss visualization. Retail uses for Kinect – to create your own personal avatar including face for size selection, virtual fashion [try-on], and weight loss simulation end uses for home, Web-based, retail or smart phone use.  TC2 Kinect

TC2 offers Virtual Fashion System and V-Dresser: Web-based and Smart Phone Virtual Fashion

One of the unique and best features about this [TC]2 mobile smart phone system is that the user can either input manual measurements, upload a body shape scan from a home based Single Windows Kinect set-up, or upload your actual bodyscanner data from your own scanner or from a registered partner scanner! This is really great. It would really be great to be linked to the Me-Ality scanners that are being installed across North America or any other publicly placed bodyscaners.

 [TC]2’s Virtual Fashion System  – makes lifelike natural pose avatars and can show them with clothing, and can predict sizes or provide custom clothing specficiations.  The TC2 system can utilize 3D clothing generated from V-Dresser, CLO3D/Marvelous Designer, OptiTex, Lectra, Maya, etc etc etc.

V-Dresser - TC2 is the world-wide distributor for V-Dresser. Leveraging recently released low cost scanning devices for home use, [TC]² has combined that low cost power and availability with its Size Selection, Avatar Creation, Virtual Fashion, and Weight Loss Visualization technologies developed over the years for use with high-accuracy 3D full body scans. The result is an extremely high value-low cost solution for retail, at-home, and web-enabled smart phone applications.

For more information on personal avatar creation email avatars@imagetwin.com

 Portable Body Scanning: Spacevision Cartesia

[TC]2 offers Spacevision Cartesia the first portable body scanning system. Space Vision Incorporated is a venture company based on the results of research undertaken at Nagoya Institute of Technology and Keio University. Julia Haselhorst, strategic manager of The Textile & Fashion Hub stated that The Council of Textile & Fashion Industries of Australia (TFIA) Textile & Fashion Hub has the Spacevision Cartesia, which uses software from TC2.

“It is much lighter, more portable, accurate and price accessible than many of the other scanners on the market.”

It is light, portable and can be set up in 15 minutes. It can scan a body shape in 2 seconds.

Digital Fabric Design: Creative & Technical Exploration

Using CLO3D to visualize engineered garments

This post summarizes a customized undergraduate student project that incorporated an exploration into and experimental development of vector based surface design graphics. The new methods explored by the student were non-repeat yardage & engineered garment design.

The aesthetic goal of this project is to capture the essence of Hawaii. Water life, flora, and volcanoes of Hawaii are incorporated into the surface designs. Research was conducted to integrate the surface theme with the traditional sarong garment styling as well as develop engineered garments inspired by the sarong.

Faith Scheffer Moeuhane-Fabric-Design-II

The challenge was to first conduct a variety of research then develop a Hawaiian theme that is integrated with current color and print trends. A new method of print design for the student involved four very large lengths of silk fabric (four sarongs)  that did not contain a repeat. Another challenge was to explore and develop custom engineered prints for garment pattern design and construction. Garment patterns were traditionally developed and digitized into the OptTtex application. From there they were exported and then imported into Adobe Illustrator where the surface graphics were added. CLO3D was used as a 3D visualization aid for viewing surface graphic design placement.

Vector based applications are perfect for creation of either large width/length pieces of yardage or for developing graphics for full-scale garment patterns because vector files are resolution free thus the file sizes are manageable as compared to raster files. Vector files can be easily exported as a raster of any quality.

The wide scale  (42″ by 72″) fabric non-repeat design was easily created by the student in Adobe Illustrator. The silk fabric yardage was printed at Inkdrop Printing. Garment patterns for this project were  created using the traditional methods of flat patternmaking and then patterns are digitized into the computer. The full-scale garment patterns were then imported into Adobe Illustrator and surface designs were created directly onto the garments patterns. 3D visualization helps with design development. Fabric was digitally printed with the digitally embellished surface patterns at Spoonflower. The two garments are then constructed.

The resulting Moe’uhane, (which means “dream” in Hawaiian) collection consists of four sarong yardages and two Hawaiian-inspired garments. They were recently presented publicly at the BSCRUNWAY 5.0 annual fashion event sponsored by the Fashion and Textile Technology Program at Buffalo State College, USA.

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Link to Faith Scheffer student designer interview

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua VII

- Summary

Flamingo Pua Collection

The Flamingo Pua project involved the design, development and creation of prototypes of a collection of 6 garments from initial concept to virtual to real garment prototypes.

The use of 2D and 3D applications throughout enables very quick response design development. This project took approximately 3 weeks from start to finish. Applications used were Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator, OptiTex, and CLO 3D.

Photoshop was used to develop the initial concept board, Illustrator was used to develop print pattern repeats and create the garment basic silhouettes, silhouettes with print patterns and all full size garment pattern surface design and graphics.

OptiTex is a very easy to use multi-dimensional application. For this project it was used for garment pattern development, initial 3D garment testing before and after graphics were applied, and export of garment patterns to Illustrator.

CLO3D was used to develop Animations for the virtual fashion show and the four-way layouts.

The four-way static posed layouts could also easily be generated in the OptiTex application.

Other product development steps you would need to complete if you were ever planning on some sort of limited production would be to create a specification pack [spec pack or tech pack] that included all detailed  garment measurements for each size you are planning to order the garment in and every single other material [fashion fabric/lining, interfacing], notion and embellishment needed to reconstruct the garment. Last but not least by any means would be to put together a costing sheet that includes all costs associated with producing the item. I will put together a follow-up post in near future.

Hope you enjoyed the series.

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

Previous posts:

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua VI: – Runway

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua V: – digital fabric printing of engineered garment pattern prototypes.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua IV: CLO3D virtual fashion show

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua III: garment pattern development in OptiTex, garment sketch development, engineered garment pattern surface design development, OptiTex 3D simulation test.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua II: color palette, print pattern and garment sketch development.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua I: inspiration, initial research for concept & silhouette development

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua IV

- CLO3D virtual fashion show

CLO3D was the application used to create a virtual fashion show for the Flamingo Pua series. I will have more posts in the near future relating to integration  testing of the CLO3D application in an educational setting for specialized use as a fashion product visualization tool as well as a student project that included the use of the CLO3D application.

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Next post: 2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua V: digital fabric printing of engineered garment pattern prototypes

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

Previous posts:

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua III: garment pattern development in OptiTex,  garment sketch development, engineered garment pattern surface design development, OptiTex 3D simulation test.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua II: color palette, print pattern and garment sketch development.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua I:  inspiration, initial research for concept & silhouette development

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua III

- Garment pattern development in OptiTex,  garment sketch development, engineered garment pattern surface design development, OptiTex 3D simulation test.

palette, print pattern and garment sketch development.

Garment patterns were quickly developed and simulations were visualized using OptiTex PDS.

Ideas for graphics were added to basic silhouette sketches (above) and used as a guide to develop final surface patterns/graphics (below).

Garment patterns were exported from OptiTex and imported into Adobe Illustrator full size (above).  All garment pattern lines were set to invisible except perimeter cut lines. Graphics and surface patterns were developed inside the cut lines for each full size garment pattern piece.

Engineered garment surface patterns were tested in the OptiTex PDS 3D application (above).

Next post: 2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua IV : Clo3D – virtual fashion show

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

Previous posts:

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua II: color palette, print pattern and garment sketch development.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua I: inspiration, initial research for concept & silhouette development

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua II

– color palette, print pattern and garment sketch development.

 

Color palette, print pattern and garment sketch development Color, styling and silhouette direction were researched using WGSN (Worth Global Styling Network). It is the leading online global trend and sourcing network.

“WGSN is the leading online trend-analysis and research service providing creative and business intelligence for the apparel, style, design and retail industries.” History of WGSN

All WGSN reports are downloadable and fully editable. My favorite category is Design and product Development –   inspiration, influences  research color key items, silhouette, styling and graphics 2 years in advance for every fashion category you can think of.

Pasted blow are the color and print patterns developed for the Flamingo Pua series.

Pasted below are the basic garment silhouette shapes developed for the Flamingo Pua series.

Next Post: 2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua III – Garment pattern development & engineered garment pattern surface design development.

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

Previous post: 2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua I : Inspiration, initial research for concept & silhouette development

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

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