Social Apps Show Most Engagement During Super Bowl 50

February 9, 2016 Leave a comment

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http://ebooks.localytics.com/2016-app-marketing-guide

FEBRUARY 9, 2016 AT 9:00 AM

The “second screen” has become a ubiquitous part of the TV experience, especially for major events like the Super Bowl. While that’s fairly common knowledge now, we wanted to see what the second screen experience actually means for marketers, so we explored app engagement during Super Bowl 50.

To no one’s surprise, we found that the second screen experience during events like Super Bowl Sunday is a great mobile engagement tactic for growing an app’s relationships with its users. Fans turned to mobile to augment the Super Bowl TV experience, extending the entertainment and social value of the national anthem, the half time show, the commercials and the celebration of the champs.

Mobile App Usage Highest at Kickoff

When looking at when apps were used the most during the game, we saw the highest time in app (measured by the length of time an average app was used in each hour period) occurred at 7 PM, right after the pregame festivities that began at 6:30 PM and the actual start of the game. At 7 PM, the average time in app was 8.7 minutes. The 7 PM peak is likely caused by people checking their phones right up until the start of the game and commenting on Lady Gaga’s national anthem performance. (Note all times are EST).

After the peak at 7 PM, fans began to spend less time in apps, likely to focus on the fast-moving game. This decrease continued until 9 PM, where time in app hit its lowest point during the game at 8.11 minutes per app.

App usage then had a spike at 10 PM, at an average of 8.4 minutes spent per app. As the game was winding down, people were engaging with apps to see reactions and comment about the game.

Social, Music, and Entertainment Apps Were the Most Popular Apps

Where exactly was all that mobile time spent? We found Social Networking apps were the most popular app category during Super Bowl 50, with an average of 3.21 app launches during the three and half hours of the game. This makes sense, as Super Bowl-watchers use social media to comment about what is happening during the game and stay connected to friends watching in a different location. For the unlucky few who were unable to watch the game live, social media also became the prime source for real-time information and updates.

Music and Entertainment Apps were also used a lot during the game, with respective averages of 2.4 and 2.2 app launches. Music continues to play a large role in the Super Bowl as the halftime show gets bigger and better every year. Many people were probably brushing up on Coldplay songs in preparation for the show and downloading them after. There was also a great deal of buzz surrounding Beyonce’s new song, which she released the night before the game and subsequently performed on the big stage.

Entertainment apps came in third place for app launches during the game, proving that the Super Bowl is more than just a sporting event. With content remaining king, many brands and apps found specialized ways to benefit from the exposure of football’s biggest night. Some entertainment apps aired, and enabled the sharing of, the commercials (some even had exclusive previews) or provided exclusive content for the game. Other entertainment apps are able to take advantage of the party-filled weekend and reported on every celebrity in attendance.

North Carolina vs Colorado : The Mobile Showdown

By now we all know that the Denver Broncos won the actual game, but who won the mobile game? Unlike the Super Bowl, the results of this matchup were much closer but, like Super Bowl 50, Colorado beat North Carolina to win the mobile title. Average app launches were even between the two states, but mobile users in Colorado spent longer in apps, beating North Carolina in average session length by 22 seconds.

Equivalent app launches but different session lengths may be explained just by the nature of the game. Perhaps fans in Colorado had longer app sessions because there was more good news to be read about the Broncos than the Panthers. Fans of Cam Newton and the Panthers may have used their phones as an escape from witnessing the hard time their team was having on the field, but, with so many apps displaying updates, they didn’t want to stay in them too long. Colorado fans, however, could endlessly scroll through their apps replaying the victory over and over.

Regardless of the type of app they manage, app marketers should see the Super Bowl as an opportunity. Today, 25 percent of apps are only used once, so finding ways to keep in touch with users is key, and the Super Bowl provides a way to get in front of them when they are most engaged.

For apps that provide value during sporting games such as the Super Bowl, there are many ways to capitalize on the exposure the second screen has to offer. For instance, marketers could send a push message at the peak time for mobile usage or deliver an in-app message with a special offer during a key moment of the game. If apps don’t have a direct connection to sporting events, there are probably other TV experiences that do make more sense. For these app owners, the major trends identified from this Super Bowl Sunday analysis may help identify the major user behaviors and moments they can use to engage users on a deeper level.

Methodology

Localytics is the leading mobile engagement platform across more than 2.7 billion devices and 37,000 mobile and web apps. Localytics processes 120 billion data points monthly.  For this study, Localytics multiplied the average sessions per user in app by the average session length across all apps to get to a Time in App measurement, and then broke it by hour and then category. For the breakdown by hour, we looked at the Time in App from 6PM to 11PM because the game started approximately at 6:30 PM and ended shortly after 10PM. The hours are based on eastern standard time.

 

http://ebooks.localytics.com/2016-app-marketing-guide

 

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NetBase Brand Passion Report: Luxury Brands 2016 The social consumer view of luxury brands

February 8, 2016 Leave a comment

 

 

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We All Have Luxuries, Big or Small Social media knows no borders—for any business. No matter your brand, no matter your company, global technology is bringing everyday consumer dynamics right into the hands of business leaders. A never-ending stream of social information reveals how consumers feel about their brands, lives, interests, and everything in between. CEOs and CMOs must navigate emerging trends, reputation challenges, brand reviews, and consumer connectivity—all at the speed of social media. Luxury isn’t going away. It’s just getting a makeover. As consumers, we define luxury at a given moment in time, from a nice gift to yourself, to a memorable experience, to a family treat. But by examining social conversations, it’s clear that luxury, as defined by the consumer, is taking on a new look. We see that the retail environment is evolving, while watches are having a resurgence. Consumers are passionate about their luxury brand choices, which often help define who they are. We see that emotions are high for the brands they love, but we also see consumers fall out of love, too. A number of popular luxury brands dropped off the list over the course of our study. Is intense competition to blame? Or is it the fickle nature of consumers?

Open The Report:

https://fashiontech.wordpress.com/2016/02/08/netbase-brand-passion-report-luxury-brands-2016-the-social-consumer-view-of-luxury-brands/

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Today’s Top Retail Stories

February 8, 2016 Leave a comment
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February 7, 2016 Leave a comment

 

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An Excellent Example of ‘Content Selling’ (from Yogasmoga)

February 6, 2016 Leave a comment
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‘Error 53’ fury mounts as Apple software update threatens to kill your iPhone 6

February 6, 2016 Leave a comment

It’s the message that spells doom and will render your handset worthless if it’s been repaired by a third party. But there’s no warning and no fix

The first customer of Apple's newest smartphone iPhone 6 in Tokyo in September 2014

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Happy days? The first customer of Apple’s iPhone 6 … but users have since reported problems with the mysterious ‘error 53’ message. Photograph: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images

 

 

Thousands of iPhone 6 users claim they have been left holding almost worthless phones because Apple’s latest operating system permanently disables the handset if it detects that a repair has been carried out by a non-Apple technician.

Relatively few people outside the tech world are aware of the so-called “error 53” problem, but if it happens to you you’ll know about it. And according to one specialist journalist, it “will kill your iPhone”.

The issue appears to affect handsets where the home button, which has touch ID fingerprint recognition built-in, has been repaired by a “non-official” company or individual. It has also reportedly affected customers whose phone has been damaged but who have been able to carry on using it without the need for a repair.

But the problem only comes to light when the latest version of Apple’s iPhone software, iOS 9, is installed. Indeed, the phone may have been working perfectly for weeks or months since a repair or being damaged.

After installation a growing number of people have watched in horror as their phone, which may well have cost them £500-plus, is rendered useless. Any photos or other data held on the handset is lost – and irretrievable.

Tech experts claim Apple knows all about the problem but has done nothing to warn users that their phone will be “bricked” (ie, rendered as technologically useful as a brick) if they install the iOS upgrade.

Photo of Antonio Olmos working in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan.
No choice: journalist Antonio Olmos dropped his iPhone while covering the refugee crisis and had to use a local repair shop

Freelance photographer and self-confessed Apple addict Antonio Olmos says this happened to his phone a few weeks ago after he upgraded his software. Olmos had previously had his handset repaired while on an assignment for the Guardian in Macedonia. “I was in the Balkans covering the refugee crisis in September when I dropped my phone. Because I desperately needed it for work I got it fixed at a local shop, as there are no Apple stores in Macedonia. They repaired the screen and home button, and it worked perfectly.”

He says he thought no more about it, until he was sent the standard notification by Apple inviting him to install the latest software. He accepted the upgrade, but within seconds the phone was displaying “error 53” and was, in effect, dead.

When Olmos, who says he has spent thousands of pounds on Apple products over the years, took it to an Apple store in London, staff told him there was nothing they could do, and that his phone was now junk. He had to pay £270 for a replacement and is furious.

“The whole thing is extraordinary. How can a company deliberately make their own products useless with an upgrade and not warn their own customers about it? Outside of the big industrialised nations, Apple stores are few and far between, and damaged phones can only be brought back to life by small third-party repairers.

“I am not even sure these third-party outfits even know this is a potential problem,” he says.

Olmos is far from the only one affected. If you Google “iPhone 6” and “error 53” you will find no shortage of people reporting that they have been left with a phone that now only functions as a very expensive paperweight.

Posting a message on an Apple Support Communities forum on 31 December, “Arjunthebuster” is typical. He/she says they bought their iPhone 6 in January 2015 in Dubai, and dropped it the following month causing a small amount of damage.

They carried on using the phone, but when they tried to install iOS 9 in November “error 53” popped up. “The error hasn’t occurred because I broke my phone (it was working fine for 10 months). I lost all my data because of this error. I don’t want Apple to fix my screen or anything! I just want them to fix the ‘error 53’ so I can use my phone, but they won’t!”

Could Apple’s move, which appears to be designed to squeeze out independent repairers, contravene competition rules? Car manufacturers, for example, are not allowed to insist that buyers only get their car serviced by them.

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Wages Rise as U.S. Unemployment Rate Falls Below 5%

February 6, 2016 Leave a comment

ECONOMY

Wages Rise as U.S. Unemployment Rate Falls Below 5%
By NELSON D. SCHWARTZFEB. 5, 2016

Continue reading the main story

Is the American worker finally getting a raise?

After years of scant real gains despite steadily falling unemployment and healthy hiring, wages picked up significantly last month, a sign the job market could be tightening enough to force companies to pay more to attract and retain employees.

The half a percentage point increase in average hourly earnings in January was the brightest spot in a generally positive Labor Department report on Friday, which showed job creation slowing from the white-hot pace of late 2015 even as the unemployment rate fell to an eight-year low of 4.9 percent.

The last six months were the best extended period for employee paychecks since the recovery began six-and-a-half years ago.

“That gain in average hourly earnings is significant,” said Diane Swonk, an independent economist in Chicago. Sustained increases are still needed to make up for years of stagnation, she added, “but it’s a move in the right direction, and that’s reassuring.”

Economists also said that the new figures suggested that the American economy was holding up well despite a slowdown in China, growing risks in emerging markets and turmoil in the stock market.

“The financial markets are leery,” said Michael Hanson, a senior economist at Bank of America Merrill Lynch, “but the labor market still looks like it’s continuing to grow.”

President Obama, who expressed frustration that he has not received the credit he feels he deserves for the country’s improving economy, said the jobs numbers were further signs of progress.

“After reaching 10 percent in 2009, the unemployment rate has now fallen to 4.9 percent even as more Americans joined the job market last month,” he told reporters at a White House briefing in Washington. “Americans are working.”

Over all, employers added 151,000 jobs last month, a pace that is strong enough to keep soaking up people looking for work if it continues in the months ahead, but a big step down from December’s revised increase of 262,000.

Continue reading the main story
The Labor Picture in January

SHARE OF
POPULATION
1-MONTH
CHANGE
JJAN.
Employed
59.6
%
+
Labor force
(workers and
unemployed)
62.7

+

4.9%
‘HIDDEN’
UNEMPLOYMENT

1-MONTH
CHANGE
In millions
JAN.
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
J
Working part
time, but want
full-time work
6.0

1-MONTH
CHANGE
1-YEAR
CHANGE
JAN.
People who
currently want
a job§
6.2

+
4.3
%


0.2
pts.

0.6
pts.
8.8

+
0.5

1.5
5.9

0.4

0.8
UNEMPLOYMENT BY
EDUCATION LEVEL
1-MONTH
CHANGE



3.7

+
0.3

0.4
JAN.
16.0
0.1

2.9

Less than
High school

7.4
%
+
High school

5.3

1-MONTH
CHANGE
1-YEAR
CHANGE
Some college
4.2

+

JAN.
Bachelor’s or higher
2.5
Unch.
28.9
+
4.7
%

9.7
%
10.9
+
3.8

18.7
TYPE OF WORK
1-MONTH
CHANGE
In millions
JAN.
Nonfarm payroll,
12-month change
Nonfarm
143.3
+
Goods
19.7

+
Services
123.6
+
Agriculture
2.4

AVERAGE WEEKLY EARNINGS

Rank-and-file
workers
1-MONTH
CHANGE
DEC.
O
J
J
A
S
N
D
J
$878.49
+
Figures are seasonally adjusted, except where noted. *Hispanics can be of any race. †Not seasonally adjusted. §People not working who say they would like to be. Includes discouraged workers and those who cannot work for reasons including ill health.
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics
By The New York Times
The combination of rising pay with a slower pace of hiring and downward pressure on prices from a stronger dollar complicates the picture for the Federal Reserve as it contemplates its next interest rate increase.

Wages have shown month-to-month strength during the recovery, only to lapse back into a funk. But a slight increase in the length of the typical workweek in January also bodes well for future salary increases, as do private reports showing the same pattern.

An increase in the minimum wage in more than a dozen states at the beginning of 2016 may also be giving hourly earnings an extra tailwind.

A December survey by PwC, the accounting and consulting firm, showed companies budgeting for salary raises of nearly 3 percent in 2016, the biggest annual increase since the recovery began. More than a third of executives said they were worried that labor costs could eat into corporate profit margins, nearly twice the number who cited that fear a year ago.

Photo

Workers starting construction on a casino in Schenectady, N.Y. The construction industry, a source of better-paying income for blue-collar workers, added 18,000 jobs in January. Credit Mike Groll/Associated Press
“No doubt about it, I’m hearing that executives are seeing wage pressures and not just in a few pockets of the country,” said Ken Esch, a partner at PwC. “It’s pretty broad-based.”

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Managers like Dave Rozenboom, president of First Premier Bank in Sioux Falls, S.D., have had to hand out raises for both existing employees and new hires.

Starting salaries for workers who handle credit card customer service and collections recently rose to $13 an hour from $11.75, Mr. Rozenboom said. Hospitals and construction firms in Sioux Falls, where the unemployment rate is 2.6 percent, are also hiring.

“The economy is as strong as it has ever been here,” Mr. Rozenboom said “It’s a very tight labor market, and we continue to hire.”

Photo

A job applicant at a military job fair in Washington in January. The economy added 2.65 million jobs last year, but many Americans say they do not feel it. Credit Gary Cameron/Reuters
Sioux Falls’s situation may be unusually robust, but the upward trajectory in employment across the country suggests to some analysts that Main Street business leaders like Mr. Rozenboom know something that the Wall Street pessimists don’t.

“The January employment report provides yet one more piece of evidence that the chance of recession this year is truly remote,” said Bernard Baumohl, chief global economist for the Economic Outlook Group in Princeton, N.J. “Economic activity should accelerate this year as rising employment, income, home values and confidence drive more spending.”

Of course, markets are mercurial, foreseeing some recessions that never come to pass, while economists often fail to see that the good times are coming to an end right up until the music stops.

There certainly have been reasons for investors to feel edgy lately, including weakness in China, plunging oil prices and disappointing retail sales figures.
By REUTERS 00:53
Obama Speaks on Improved Economy
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Obama Speaks on Improved Economy
The president said Friday that the United States economy is “the strongest, most durable” in the world, showing a rise in wages and a decline in unemployment. By REUTERS on Publish Date February 5, 2016. Photo by Drew Angerer for The New York Times. Watch in Times Video »
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Those industries closely tied to commodity markets where prices are dropping showed real weakness last month. Stripping out seasonal adjustments, oil and gas drillers laid off more than 2,000 workers in January, wiping out four years of employment gains. The overall mining industry, which includes the oil sector, has shed 146,000 jobs since September 2014.

But jobs in manufacturing, in a reversal from its weakness in the second half of 2015, surged last month, rising by 29,000. The strong dollar and weak export markets in Asia and Europe have hurt factory employment, but some experts suggested that the worst might now be over.

“It’s a sign the manufacturing sector may be stabilizing,” said Scott Anderson, chief economist at Bank of the West in San Francisco. While the factory sector in the United States is not nearly the size it once was, it plays an important role in the ups and downs of the business cycle and is a source of better-paying jobs for blue-collar workers who have fared poorly in recent decades.

The construction industry, another source of higher-paying working-class jobs, also held up well, adding 18,000 jobs despite the colder weather in the eastern half of the country.

The overall figures for job creation, as well as the sector-by-sector data, are likely to be revised in future months as more data comes in. The proportion of Americans who are in the labor force, which has been stuck at lows not seen since the late 1970s, ticked up slightly in January.

As has been the case since the current recovery began in mid-2009, the most educated workers are doing the best in today’s job market: The unemployment rate for college graduates was unchanged in January at 2.5 percent, while joblessness rose to 7.4 percent for people without a high school diploma.

“We do think the unemployment rate will continue to drift lower and that will support wage growth,” said Michael Gapen, chief United States economist at Barclays. “We don’t think the economy is sliding into a recession.”

Gardiner Harris contributed reporting from Washington.

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