Home > Uncategorized > CFOs and provosts discuss technology priorities for their colleges

CFOs and provosts discuss technology priorities for their colleges

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Read this online book:

http://images.results.chronicle.com/Web/TheChronicleofHigherEducation/%7Bee807186-52f2-4dc7-a328-b7bb6bc9c49f%7D_2015_CFO_Report_v5.pdf

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

A recent focus on controlling spending and improving student outcomes has put pressure on both academic and financial officials to work more closely together.

For much of the modern history of American higher education, the academic side of institutions has enjoyed a relatively high degree of autonomy from the business side. As mission-driven organizations, colleges and universities always were adding programs and people as enrollment grew and knowledge expanded.

Higher tuition was often just a by-product of doing business. But a focus in recent years on controlling spending and improving student outcomes has put pressure on both academic and financial officials to work more closely together on allocating resources to sustain current programs and plan for a future of tighter budgets. In doing so, both sides have had to learn the motivations and mindsets of the other.

An extensive survey of college and university chief academic officers (CAOs) and chief financial officers (CFOs), conducted by The Chronicle of Higher Education in February 2015, found that the two sides largely agree about many issues facing higher education and their institutions. For instance, both groups worry about the financial sustainability of American higher education: three-fourths of chief academic officers and chief financial officers think it’s going in the wrong direction. But on a host of other issues, the two groups of senior leaders don’t always see eyeto-eye.

Provosts, for example, were twice as likely as CFOs to say that the current discussion about the amount of academic transformation needed on college campuses was overblown. The survey, completed by more than 400 provosts and chief financial officers at two- and four-year colleges, focused on their attitudes about financial sustainability, the future of the faculty, academic innovation, and their own careers. Read the full survey:

http://images.results.chronicle.com/Web/TheChronicleofHigherEducation/%7Bee807186-52f2-4dc7-a328-b7bb6bc9c49f%7D_2015_CFO_Report_v5.pdf

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