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Archive for January, 2017

Which of these designers should win a beach getaway in Mexico

January 29, 2017 Leave a comment

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Which of these designers should win a beach getaway in Mexico? Vote now!

What is missing from contemporary workwear? What work related problems can be made easier (or solved) with clothing design? How would you design clothing to be used at home, in the office and back? Clothes for all occasions – day to night, at your desk, on a plane, in the boardroom, and all the places work could take you.

We asked our community to design their best workwear, and they delivered! Pick your favorite designs now by clicking “vote”!

See full rules and regs here*

Womens “Specialist” Soft Shell Blazer

Womens “Specialist” Soft Shell Blazer

Designer:

James G.L. Hands

Women's Ultimate Office Shirt

Women’s Ultimate Office Shirt

Designer:

Kristin W.

Jackety Dress, Dressy Jacket

Jackety Dress, Dressy Jacket

Designer:

Susan Polston

Concealed Reversible Hi-Lo Skirt

Concealed Reversible Hi-Lo Skirt

Designer:

Rachel B.

Byebye Old Tie

Byebye Old Tie

Designer:

Anjali K.

The Two-Faced Midi Skirt

The Two-Faced Midi Skirt

Designer:

Elizabeth I.

Professional Pant w/ Internal Pockets

Professional Pant w/ Internal Pockets

Designer:

Calley G.

Knit Tweed Travel Suit

Knit Tweed Travel Suit

Designer:

Andre G.

The A Game Jacket

The A Game Jacket

Designer:

Monica R.

Off-Duty Jogger

Off-Duty Jogger

Designer:

Meghan C.

Adjustable-Length Women's Slacks

Adjustable-Length Women’s Slacks

Designer:

Lynn F.

Easy Asymmetry Dress

Easy Asymmetry Dress

Designer:

Mila P.

Corporate Boho

Corporate Boho

Designer:

Meghan C.

Cozy Work And Play Pant

Cozy Work And Play Pant

Designer:

Michelle C.

City Spring

City Spring

Designer:

Meghan C.

Oversized Hoodie

Oversized Hoodie

Designer:

Michelle C.

Ingenuity Blazer

Ingenuity Blazer

Designer:

Weiying K.

Metamorphosis Of Workwear To Travel

Metamorphosis Of Workwear To Travel

Designer:

Tanuka G.

Waist Definer Dress

Waist Definer Dress

Designer:

Jumey D.

Sunrise To Sunset Glamorous Skirt

Sunrise To Sunset Glamorous Skirt

Designer:

Elena Naylor

I Get The Job Done Executive Dress

I Get The Job Done Executive Dress

Designer:

Jennifer H.

Lantern

Lantern

Designer:

James G.L. Hands

Ombre Pajama Dress

Ombre Pajama Dress

Designer:

Cristina W.

Everybody's Dress

Everybody’s Dress

Designer:

Mary G.

Sheer Beauty Dress

Sheer Beauty Dress

Designer:

Casey Schuckers

Subtle Superwoman Shirt

Subtle Superwoman Shirt

Designer:

Vivian C.

Day to night 2 piece elegant dress look

Day to night 2 piece elegant dress look

Designer:

Mila P.

Balance + Unbalance

Balance + Unbalance

Designer:

Henry S. H . L.

Multi-Tasking Dress

Multi-Tasking Dress

Designer:

Leslie Troisi

Girl Fun

Girl Fun

Designer:

Karen W.

The Ponte Paper Doll Set

The Ponte Paper Doll Set

Designer:

Teresa A.

HoodRuck

HoodRuck

Designer:

James G.L. Hands

Lady Trench Vest

Lady Trench Vest

Designer:

Monika S.

Hygge Blazer

Hygge Blazer

Designer:

Elizabeth K.

Ascend

Ascend

Designer:

Leslie J.

4 in 1 Convertible Dress

4 in 1 Convertible Dress

Designer:

CarLeisha G.

Strong Man's Jacket

Strong Man’s Jacket

Designer:

Susan Polston

(Bomb)shell

(Bomb)shell

Designer:

Vivian C.

Infinite Travel Suits You

Infinite Travel Suits You

Designer:

Krista C. S.

Pullover With Built In Tie

Pullover With Built In Tie

Designer:

Grace R.

The Varsity Jackpack

The Varsity Jackpack

Designer:

Josh L.

Sleeping-On-Duty Pants

Sleeping-On-Duty Pants

Designer:

Cristobal A.

Guayaberón

Guayaberón

Designer:

Jumey D.

Athletic Wear Button Up Shirts

Athletic Wear Button Up Shirts

Designer:

Casey Schuckers

Hersie

Hersie

Designer:

Carrie C.

Accelerator Pant

Accelerator Pant

Designer:

Cristobal A.

Pocket Perfect Dress

Pocket Perfect Dress

Everyday In Every Way Work Dress

Everyday In Every Way Work Dress

Designer:

Kristle D.

Secret Sweatshirt Everywhere Dress

Secret Sweatshirt Everywhere Dress

Designer:

Nicole H.

The New Casual Suit

The New Casual Suit

Designer:

Rachel T.

The Mini Capsule

The Mini Capsule

Designer:

Paula B.

Lighthouse

Lighthouse

Designer:

James G.L. Hands

2-in-1 Convertible Knit Dress for any occasion.

2-in-1 Convertible Knit Dress for any occasion.

Designer:

Mila P.

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Categories: Uncategorized

WGSN Insider news

January 27, 2017 Leave a comment

 

Eloquii’s first store, the plus size market and the future of retail

The plus-size market is not short of publicity this year, as the $21.1 billion industry seems to have finally garnered the mainstream media attention it deserves. Among the advances are trend-savvy brands that have upped the ante for an industry long left in the design dark ages.

A leader among this movement is the popular e-commerce site Eloquii, a brand formerly owned by The Limited that has seen a turbulent rise in its few short years. Not long after their launch in 2011, Limited Brands shuttered the Eloquii business, which was later saved by a group of several investors. A successful relaunch has brought the business to where it is today – a booming $20 million a year venture that is in high-demand among the plus-size community. The brand is striking while the iron is hot in the plus-size sector, which in this case, means moving from their web-only presence to the ‘touch-me, try-me’ world of physical retail.

A Look From Eloquii's Latest Collection

WGSN_BLOG_RETAIL_1_Eloquii

Eloquii will be rolling out its concept shop at the Fashion Centre at Pentagon City in Arlington, Virginia. The three-month lease will serve as a testing ground, offering key insights into how the Eloquii consumer acts offline, feeding into the overall omni-channel experience that Eloquii looks to offer their community. The location was chosen based on accumulated online consumer data – D.C. is one of Eloquii’s  strongest performing markets.

This, along with countless other reasons, offers a glimpse into what makes the online to offline move so strategic and appealing to brands – the abundance of consumer data collected by e-tailers offers a blueprint as to where their consumer is located, what their demographics are and what they buy. The store experience can be built around this information, offering a truly customised experience on a large scale. 

Amazon's Latest Retail Model - Amazon Go

Of course Eloquii isn’t the first to make the leap. Bonobos, Warby Parker, Nasty Gal and Rent The Runway have all dabbled in on-to-offline conversions with mostly winning results. The beauty is in the strategy. Each brand from Amazon to Etsy has delivered something unique to the consumer during the omni-channel transition. Amazon has recently a opened cashier-free ‘smart’ grocery store in Seattle that allows consumers to pay with a tap of their phone, with plans for curbside collect grocery stores to roll out later this year. Warby Parker just announced an expansion of 25 new stores in 2017 earlier this week, playing off of their popular direct to consumer model. Etsy has partnered with major department stores Macy’s and Selfridges, offering a touch of their artisan feel to a larger corporate entity. And fast-fashion juniors’ brands Nasty Gal and MissGuided have opened permanent bricks and mortar locations that look and feel exactly as you’d hope they would – a true extension of their online personas. 

MissGuided's Westfield Stratford City Store

The balance of retail is shifting for 2017 as we see physical footprints scaling back and online shopping increasing. An emphasis on fewer, more targeted locations is top priority, linked to a flexible inventory that can support a strong experience across channels. The opportunity for creative expansion is rife as retailers develop new business models that cut out the middle man, the mark-up and the on-hand inventory which effectively, cuts down the overhead and often, the end price – a winning trend for all involved that is sure to keep the ever-changing retail landscape a hotbed for ingenuity in 2017.

Want to keep up with the latest retail hot spots? Follow Sidney on her instagram here.

Know what’s next. Become a WGSN member today to benefit from our daily trend intelligence, retail analytics, consumer insights and bespoke consultancy services.

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Categories: Uncategorized

Quest for Speed and Customization Forces Re-imagined Supply Chains

January 27, 2017 Leave a comment

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We live in a time when brands may very well be making clothes halfway around the world. It’s also an age when customers want newness both in-store and online every few weeks. They also like the idea of customizing their apparel. And did we mention, some consumers are excited by the idea of same-day delivery via drones? Figuring out these logistics has made supply chain management super valuable. Now, with some of the new technology being employed, it might start seeming a little sexier, too.

Online and in-store apparel shopping are converging to the point where some in the field have even stopped using the term omnichannel as all channels are to be seamless for the customer.

And if time is money, speed is gold. So when a customer wants something as relatively simple as, say, a pink sweatshirt that’s exclusive to one retailer, stores and brands are feeling the pressure to step up their game in order to serve customers and exceed their expectations.

This desire to fit more satisfaction into a tighter, more efficient timeframe has led some major companies like Nike, Adidas and Under Armour to engage in supply chain practices that shorten the distance from point A to point B, or from shelf to customer. Target also invested more than $2 billion to upgrade its supply chain infrastructure last year, and its goal is to improve e-commerce sales, localize assortment in stores and open more smaller-format stores in urban markets.

Hyper-effective practices are aggressive, but practically a necessity in today’s retail market. Nearly half of all consumers (47 percent) say they want their favorite apparel store to offer new styles once per month or more often, according to the Cotton Incorporated Lifestyle Monitor Survey. Among women, that number jumps to 55 percent and it reaches 65 percent among shoppers under 35 years old—the coveted Millennial sector.

Further, nearly a quarter of all shoppers under 35 (22 percent) and 17 percent of women would like to see new styles every two weeks, according to Monitor research.

While that’s a lot of newness to produce, it provides an opportunity for retailers. That’s because 54 percent of consumers say they’re more likely to buy clothes from a store that has new clothes every few weeks, the Monitor survey finds. That number jumps to 61 percent among women and 67 percent among those ages 25 to 34.

To that end, Nike took the bull by the horns last summer and joined with private equity giant Apollo in a venture aiming to increase regional manufacturing capabilities, enable quicker delivery of more customized product to consumers, and drive investment in sustainability.

The Nike/Apollo partnership saw Apollo buying existing apparel suppliers and textile firms in North and Central America, with plans to invest in advancing their manufacturing operations and expertise in producing innovative, technical and customized apparel. The idea is to create a more nimble, vertically integrated system, from material suppliers, manufacturers and embellishment to warehousing and logistics.

“We are excited to be working with Apollo to rethink a new supply chain model to revolutionize apparel manufacturing in the Americas,” said Nike chief operating officer Eric Sprunk. “The new company, under Apollo’s leadership, is committed to embedding sustainability and transparency into the business, investing in new technology, vertically integrating critical elements of the supply chain and delivering the best Nike performance product to our retail and sports partners.”

Nike’s venture would appeal to the 76 percent of consumers who are likely to buy from a store that offers apparel that is made in the USA, according to Monitor data.

Monitor data also shows 70 percent of consumers say they “would be more loyal to brands and retailers that gave me the ability to customize their clothing.” This figure rises to 76 percent among those age 13 to 34. Additionally, 64 percent of consumers would likely buy clothes from a store that gives them the ability to personalize their clothes for free.

Another active giant, Adidas, is looking for an inside edge on this desire for customization with its new production facilities, each of which is dubbed a “SPEEDFACTORY.” An Atlanta site is scheduled to open in 2017, joining an existing facility in Germany. The factories use robotic manufacturing to produce footwear that can be customized to the needs of individual consumers.

“For years our industry has been playing by the same rules manufacturing product remotely in Asia,” said Adidas Group executive board member Eric Liedtke, who is responsible for global brands. “We are obsessed with bringing all steps of the creation process home to America. We’re fueling design at the ground level of creativity in Brooklyn and reinventing manufacturing with the first Adidas SPEEDFACTORY in Atlanta. This allows us to make product for the consumer, with the consumer, where the consumer lives in real time, unleashing unparalleled creativity and endless opportunities for customization in America.”

Like its German facility, Adidas’ U.S. factory will be equipped with cutting-edge manufacturing technologies, allowing it to “create products in increasingly high volumes with advanced complexity in color, materials and sizes” and, “unprecedented customization of high-performance products with unique fit, comfort and look.” Both facilities are operated by the firm’s strategic partner Oechsler.

While Adidas’ locations are dedicated to footwear, Under Armour’s new UA Lighthouse center in Baltimore is bringing cutting edge technology to both footwear and apparel. The facility uses 3-D design and body scanning to create custom product while reducing waste in the development process. It’s also using 3-D printing and rapid prototyping. And it will serve as a proving ground to see how concepts will perform in a full-scale production environment. Under Armour has partnered with a number of organizations in this venture, including The University of Maryland’s engineering department, the Dow Chemical Company, Huntsman, Lectra, Bemis, Epson, Desma, and 3dMD, among others.

“We are excited about this game-changing opportunity and the endless possibilities created by bringing together our talented team and our world-class partners, to pioneer the future of design and manufacturing,” Under Armour’s president of product and innovation Kevin Haley, said.

4 DAYS AGO by

We live in a time when brands may very well be making clothes halfway around the world. It’s also an age when customers want newness both in-store and online every few weeks. They also like the idea of customizing their apparel. And did we mention, some consumers are excited by the idea of same-day delivery via drones? Figuring out these logistics has made supply chain management super valuable. Now, with some of the new technology being employed, it might start seeming a little sexier, too.

Online and in-store apparel shopping are converging to the point where some in the field have even stopped using the term omnichannel as all channels are to be seamless for the customer.

And if time is money, speed is gold. So when a customer wants something as relatively simple as, say, a pink sweatshirt that’s exclusive to one retailer, stores and brands are feeling the pressure to step up their game in order to serve customers and exceed their expectations.

This desire to fit more satisfaction into a tighter, more efficient timeframe has led some major companies like Nike, Adidas and Under Armour to engage in supply chain practices that shorten the distance from point A to point B, or from shelf to customer. Target also invested more than $2 billion to upgrade its supply chain infrastructure last year, and its goal is to improve e-commerce sales, localize assortment in stores and open more smaller-format stores in urban markets.

Hyper-effective practices are aggressive, but practically a necessity in today’s retail market. Nearly half of all consumers (47 percent) say they want their favorite apparel store to offer new styles once per month or more often, according to the Cotton Incorporated Lifestyle Monitor Survey. Among women, that number jumps to 55 percent and it reaches 65 percent among shoppers under 35 years old—the coveted Millennial sector.

Further, nearly a quarter of all shoppers under 35 (22 percent) and 17 percent of women would like to see new styles every two weeks, according to Monitor research.

While that’s a lot of newness to produce, it provides an opportunity for retailers. That’s because 54 percent of consumers say they’re more likely to buy clothes from a store that has new clothes every few weeks, the Monitor survey finds. That number jumps to 61 percent among women and 67 percent among those ages 25 to 34.

To that end, Nike took the bull by the horns last summer and joined with private equity giant Apollo in a venture aiming to increase regional manufacturing capabilities, enable quicker delivery of more customized product to consumers, and drive investment in sustainability.

The Nike/Apollo partnership saw Apollo buying existing apparel suppliers and textile firms in North and Central America, with plans to invest in advancing their manufacturing operations and expertise in producing innovative, technical and customized apparel. The idea is to create a more nimble, vertically integrated system, from material suppliers, manufacturers and embellishment to warehousing and logistics.

“We are excited to be working with Apollo to rethink a new supply chain model to revolutionize apparel manufacturing in the Americas,” said Nike chief operating officer Eric Sprunk. “The new company, under Apollo’s leadership, is committed to embedding sustainability and transparency into the business, investing in new technology, vertically integrating critical elements of the supply chain and delivering the best Nike performance product to our retail and sports partners.”

Nike’s venture would appeal to the 76 percent of consumers who are likely to buy from a store that offers apparel that is made in the USA, according to Monitor data.

Monitor data also shows 70 percent of consumers say they “would be more loyal to brands and retailers that gave me the ability to customize their clothing.” This figure rises to 76 percent among those age 13 to 34. Additionally, 64 percent of consumers would likely buy clothes from a store that gives them the ability to personalize their clothes for free.

Another active giant, Adidas, is looking for an inside edge on this desire for customization with its new production facilities, each of which is dubbed a “SPEEDFACTORY.” An Atlanta site is scheduled to open in 2017, joining an existing facility in Germany. The factories use robotic manufacturing to produce footwear that can be customized to the needs of individual consumers.

“For years our industry has been playing by the same rules manufacturing product remotely in Asia,” said Adidas Group executive board member Eric Liedtke, who is responsible for global brands. “We are obsessed with bringing all steps of the creation process home to America. We’re fueling design at the ground level of creativity in Brooklyn and reinventing manufacturing with the first Adidas SPEEDFACTORY in Atlanta. This allows us to make product for the consumer, with the consumer, where the consumer lives in real time, unleashing unparalleled creativity and endless opportunities for customization in America.”

Like its German facility, Adidas’ U.S. factory will be equipped with cutting-edge manufacturing technologies, allowing it to “create products in increasingly high volumes with advanced complexity in color, materials and sizes” and, “unprecedented customization of high-performance products with unique fit, comfort and look.” Both facilities are operated by the firm’s strategic partner Oechsler.

While Adidas’ locations are dedicated to footwear, Under Armour’s new UA Lighthouse center in Baltimore is bringing cutting edge technology to both footwear and apparel. The facility uses 3-D design and body scanning to create custom product while reducing waste in the development process. It’s also using 3-D printing and rapid prototyping. And it will serve as a proving ground to see how concepts will perform in a full-scale production environment. Under Armour has partnered with a number of organizations in this venture, including The University of Maryland’s engineering department, the Dow Chemical Company, Huntsman, Lectra, Bemis, Epson, Desma, and 3dMD, among others.

“We are excited about this game-changing opportunity and the endless possibilities created by bringing together our talented team and our world-class partners, to pioneer the future of design and manufacturing,” Under Armour’s president of product and innovation Kevin Haley, said.

Categories: Uncategorized

2016 Stanford Commencement address by Ken Burns

January 25, 2017 Leave a comment

 

Following is the text of the address by Ken Burns, historical documentary filmmaker, as prepared for delivery at Stanford University’s 125th Commencement on June 12, 2016.

Filmmaker Ken Burns delivers the Commencement address.

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Filmmaker Ken Burns delivers the Commencement address. (Image credit: L.A. Cicero)

 

JUNE 12, 2016

President Hennessy, members of the Board of Trustees, distinguished faculty and staff, proud and relieved parents, calm and serene grandparents, distracted but secretly pleased siblings, ladies and gentlemen, graduating students of the Class of 2016, good morning. I am deeply honored and privileged that you have asked me here to say a few words at so momentous an occasion, that you might find what I have to say worthy of your attention on so important a day, especially one with such historical significance. One hundred and twenty-five years. Wow.

Thank you, too, for that generous introduction, President Hennessy. I always feel compelled, though, to inoculate myself against such praise by remembering that I have on my refrigerator at home an old and now faded cartoon, which shows two men standing in hell, the flames licking up around them. One guy says to the other, “Apparently my over 200 screen credits didn’t mean a damn thing.” They don’t, of course; there is much more meaning in your accomplishments, which we memorialize today.

“The past often offers an illuminating and clear-headed perspective from which to observe and reconcile the passions of the present moment, just when they threaten to overwhelm us.”

—KEN BURNS

I am in the business of memorializing – of history. It is not always a popular subject on college campuses today, particularly when, at times, it may seem to some an anachronistic and irrelevant pursuit, particularly with the ferocious urgency this moment seems to exert on us. It is my job, however, to remind people – with story, memory, anecdote and feeling – of the power our past also exerts, to help us better understand what’s going on now. It is my job to try to discern patterns and themes from history to enable us to interpret our dizzying, and sometimes dismaying, present. For nearly 40 years now, I have diligently practiced and rigorously maintained a conscious neutrality in my work, avoiding the advocacy of many of my colleagues, trying to speak to all of my fellow citizens.

Over those decades of historical documentary filmmaking, I have also come to the realization that history is not a fixed thing, a collection of precise dates, facts and events that add up to a quantifiable, certain, confidently known truth. History is a mysterious and malleable thing, constantly changing, not just as new information emerges, but as our own interests, emotions and inclinations change. Each generation rediscovers and reexamines that part of its past that gives its present new meaning, new possibility and new power. The question becomes for us now – for you especially – what will we choose as our inspiration? Which distant events and long dead figures will provide us with the greatest help, the most coherent context and the wisdom to go forward?

This is in part an existential question. None of us gets out of here alive. An exception will not be made in your case and you’ll live forever. You can’t actually design your life. (If you want to make God laugh, the saying goes, tell her your plans.) The hard times and vicissitudes of life will ultimately visit everyone. You will also come to realize that you are less defined by the good things that happen to you, your moments of happiness and apparent control, than you are by those misfortunes and unexpected challenges that, in fact, shape you more definitively, and help to solidify your true character – the measure of any human value. You, especially, know that the conversation that comes out of tragedy and injustice needs to be encouraged, emphasis on courage. It is through those conversations that we make progress.

A mentor of mine, the journalist Tom Brokaw, recently said to me, “What we learn is more important than what we set out to do.” It’s tough out there, but so beautiful, too. And history – memory – can prepare you.

I have a searing memory of the summer of 1962, when I was almost 9, joining our family dinner on a hot, sweltering day in a tract house in a development in Newark, Delaware, and seeing my mother crying. She had just learned, and my brother and I had just been told, that she would be dead of cancer within six months. But that’s not what was causing her tears. Our inadequate health insurance had practically bankrupted us, and our neighbors – equally struggling working people – had taken up a collection and presented my parents with six crisp $20 bills – $120 in total – enough to keep us solvent for more than a month. In that moment, I understood something about community and courage, about constant struggle and little victories. That hot June evening was a victory. And I have spent my entire professional life trying to resurrect small moments within the larger sweep of American history, trying to find our better angels in the most difficult of circumstances, trying to wake the dead, to hear their stories.

But how do we keep that realization of our own inevitable mortality from paralyzing us with fear? And how do we also keep our usual denial of this fact from depriving our lives and our actions of real meaning, of real purpose? This is our great human challenge, your challenge. This is where history can help. The past often offers an illuminating and clear-headed perspective from which to observe and reconcile the passions of the present moment, just when they threaten to overwhelm us. The history we know, the stories we tell ourselves, relieve that existential anxiety, allow us to live beyond our fleeting lifespans, and permit us to value and love and distinguish what is important. And the practice of history, both personal and professional, becomes a kind of conscience for us.

“The sense of commonwealth, of shared sacrifice, of trust, so much a part of American life, is eroding fast, spurred along and amplified by an amoral Internet that permits a lie to circle the globe three times before the truth can get started.”

—KEN BURNS

As a filmmaker, as a historian, as an American, I have been drawn continually to the life and example and words of Abraham Lincoln. He seems to get us better than we get ourselves. One hundred and fifty-eight years ago, in mid-June of 1858, Abraham Lincoln, running in what would be a failed bid for the United States Senate, at a time of bitter partisanship in our national politics, almost entirely over the issue of slavery, spoke to the Republican State Convention in the Illinois Statehouse in Springfield. His political party was brand new, born barely four years before with one single purpose in mind: to end the intolerable hypocrisy of chattel slavery that still existed in a country promoting certain unalienable rights to itself and the world.

He said, “A house divided against itself cannot stand.”

Four and half years later, he was president, presiding over a country in the midst of the worst crisis in American history, our Civil War, giving his Annual Message to Congress, what we now call the State of the Union. The state of the Union was not good. His house was divided. But he also saw the larger picture. “The dogmas of the quiet past are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise – with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think anew, and act anew. We must disenthrall ourselves, and then we shall save our country.”

And then he went on: “Fellow citizens, we cannot escape history. … The fiery trial through which we pass will light us down, in honor or dishonor, to the latest generation. We say we are for Union. The world will not forget that we say this. We know how to save the Union. … In giving freedom to the slave, we assure freedom to the free – honorable alike in what we give, and what we preserve. We shall nobly save, or meanly lose, the last best hope of earth.”

You are the latest generation he was metaphorically speaking about, and you are, whether you are yet aware of it or not, charged with saving our Union. The stakes are slightly different than the ones Lincoln faced – there is not yet armed rebellion – but they are just as high. And before you go out and try to live and shape the rest of your life, you are required now to rise, as Lincoln implored us, with the occasion.

You know, it is terribly fashionable these days to criticize the United States government, the institution Lincoln was trying to save, to blame it for all the ills known to humankind, and, my goodness, ladies and gentlemen, it has made more than its fair share of catastrophic mistakes. But you would be hard pressed to find – in all of human history – a greater force for good. From our Declaration of Independence to our Constitution and Bill of Rights; from Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation and the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth and Nineteenth Amendments to the Land Grant College and Homestead Acts; from the transcontinental railroad and our national parks to child labor laws, Social Security and the National Labor Relations Act; from the GI Bill and the interstate highway system to putting a man on the moon and the Affordable Care Act, the United States government has been the author of many of the best aspects of our public and personal lives. But if you tune in to politics, if you listen to the rhetoric of this election cycle, you are made painfully aware that everything is going to hell in a handbasket and the chief culprit is our evil government.

Part of the reason this kind of criticism sticks is because we live in an age of social media where we are constantly assured that we are all independent free agents. But that free agency is essentially unconnected to real community, divorced from civic engagement, duped into believing in our own lonely primacy by a sophisticated media culture that requires you – no, desperately needs you – to live in an all-consuming disposable present, wearing the right blue jeans, driving the right car, carrying the right handbag, eating at all the right places, blissfully unaware of the historical tides that have brought us to this moment, blissfully uninterested in where those tides might take us.

Our spurious sovereignty is reinforced and perpetually underscored to our obvious and great comfort, but this kind of existence actually ingrains in us a stultifying sameness that rewards conformity (not courage), ignorance and anti-intellectualism (not critical thinking). This wouldn’t be so bad if we were just wasting our own lives, but this year our political future depends on it. And there comes a time when I – and you – can no longer remain neutral, silent. We must speak up – and speak out.

“We must remain committed to the kindness and community that are the hallmarks of civilization.”

—KEN BURNS

For 216 years, our elections, though bitterly contested, have featured the philosophies and character of candidates who were clearly qualified. That is not the case this year. One is glaringly not qualified. So before you do anything with your well-earned degree, you must do everything you can to defeat the retrograde forces that have invaded our democratic process, divided our house, to fight against, no matter your political persuasion, the dictatorial tendencies of the candidate with zero experience in the much maligned but subtle art of governance; who is against lots of things, but doesn’t seem to be for anything, offering only bombastic and contradictory promises, and terrifying Orwellian statements; a person who easily lies, creating an environment where the truth doesn’t seem to matter; who has never demonstrated any interest in anyone or anything but himself and his own enrichment; who insults veterans, threatens a free press, mocks the handicapped, denigrates women, immigrants and all Muslims; a man who took more than a day to remember to disavow a supporter who advocates white supremacy and the Ku Klux Klan; an infantile, bullying man who, depending on his mood, is willing to discard old and established alliances, treaties and long-standing relationships. I feel genuine sorrow for the understandably scared and – they feel – powerless people who have flocked to his campaign in the mistaken belief that – as often happens on TV – a wand can be waved and every complicated problem can be solved with the simplest of solutions. They can’t. It is a political Ponzi scheme. And asking this man to assume the highest office in the land would be like asking a newly minted car driver to fly a 747.

As a student of history, I recognize this type. He emerges everywhere and in all eras. We see nurtured in his campaign an incipient proto-fascism, a nativist anti-immigrant Know Nothing-ism, a disrespect for the judiciary, the prospect of women losing authority over their own bodies, African Americans again asked to go to the back of the line, voter suppression gleefully promoted, jingoistic saber rattling, a total lack of historical awareness, a political paranoia that, predictably, points fingers, always making the other wrong. These are all virulent strains that have at times infected us in the past. But they now loom in front of us again – all happening at once. We know from our history books that these are the diseases of ancient and now fallen empires. The sense of commonwealth, of shared sacrifice, of trust, so much a part of American life, is eroding fast, spurred along and amplified by an amoral Internet that permits a lie to circle the globe three times before the truth can get started.

We no longer have the luxury of neutrality or “balance,” or even of bemused disdain. Many of our media institutions have largely failed to expose this charlatan, torn between a nagging responsibility to good journalism and the big ratings a media circus always delivers. In fact, they have given him the abundant airtime he so desperately craves, so much so that it has actually worn down our natural human revulsion to this kind of behavior. Hey, he’s rich; he must be doing something right. He is not. Edward R. Murrow would have exposed this naked emperor months ago. He is an insult to our history. Do not be deceived by his momentary “good behavior.” It is only a spoiled, misbehaving child hoping somehow to still have dessert.

And do not think that the tragedy in Orlando underscores his points. It does not. We must “disenthrall ourselves,” as Abraham Lincoln said, from the culture of violence and guns. And then “we shall save our country.”

This is not a liberal or conservative issue, a red state, blue state divide. This is an American issue. Many honorable people, including the last two Republican presidents, members of the party of Abraham Lincoln, have declined to support him. And I implore those “Vichy Republicans” who have endorsed him to please, please reconsider. We must remain committed to the kindness and community that are the hallmarks of civilization and reject the troubling, unfiltered Tourette’s of his tribalism.

The next few months of your “commencement,” that is to say, your future, will be critical to the survival of our Republic. “The occasion is piled high with difficulty.” Let us pledge here today that we will not let this happen to the exquisite, yet deeply flawed, land we all love and cherish – and hope to leave intact to our posterity. Let us “nobly save,” not “meanly lose, the last best hope of earth.”

Let me speak directly to the graduating class. Watch out. Here comes the advice.

Look. I am the father of four daughters. If someone tells you they’ve been sexually assaulted, take it effing seriously. And listen to them! Maybe, some day, we will make the survivor’s eloquent statement as important as Dr. King’s Letter from a Birmingham Jail.

Try not to make the other wrong, as I just did with that “presumptive” nominee. Be for something.

Be curious, not cool. Feed your soul, too. Every day.

Remember, insecurity makes liars of us all. Not just presidential candidates.

Don’t confuse success with excellence. The poet Robert Penn Warren once told me that “careerism is death.”

Do not descend too deeply into specialism either. Educate all of your parts. You will be healthier.

Free yourselves from the limitations of the binary world. It is just a tool. A means, not an end.

Seek out – and have – mentors. Listen to them. The late theatrical director Tyrone Guthrie once said, “We are looking for ideas large enough to be afraid of again.” Embrace those new ideas. Bite off more than you can chew.

Travel. Do not get stuck in one place. Visit our national parks. Their sheer majesty may remind you of your own “atomic insignificance,” as one observer noted, but in the inscrutable ways of Nature, you will feel larger, inspirited, just as the egotist in our midst is diminished by his or her self-regard.

Insist on heroes. And be one.

Read. The book is still the greatest manmade machine of all – not the car, not the TV, not the smartphone.

Make babies. One of the greatest things that will happen to you is that you will have to worry – I mean really worry – about someone other than yourself. It is liberating and exhilarating. I promise. Ask your parents.

Do not lose your enthusiasm. In its Greek etymology, the word enthusiasm means simply, “God in us.”

Serve your country. Insist that we fight the right wars. Convince your government, as Lincoln knew, that the real threat always and still comes from within this favored land. Governments always forget that.

Insist that we support science and the arts, especially the arts. They have nothing to do with the actual defense of our country – they just make our country worth defending.

Believe, as Arthur Miller told me in an interview for my very first film on the Brooklyn Bridge, “believe, that maybe you too could add something that would last and be beautiful.”

And vote. You indelibly underscore your citizenship – and our connection with each other – when you do.

Good luck. And Godspeed.

Categories: Uncategorized

Talking Dog (really!)

January 22, 2017 Leave a comment
Categories: Uncategorized

Anti-Trump Women March Worldwide

January 21, 2017 Leave a comment

imgres.png

Saturday January 21, 2017

Women Around the World Protest Trump as US President 

washington-overall-TC.jpg

WashingtonChang Lee/The New York Times

new-york1.jpg

New York CityNicole Craine for The New York Times

chicago-tc.jpg

ChicagoJohn J. Kim/Chicago Tribune via Associated Press

los-angeles-TC.jpg

Los AngelesJae C. Hong/Associated Press

Philadelphia.jpg

PhiladelphiaJacqueline Larma/Associated Press

boston2.jpg

BostonJohn T. Lumacki/The Boston Globe via Associated Press

sanfran.jpg

San FranciscoJim Wilson/The New York Times

atlanta-new-TC.jpg

AtlantaKevin D. Liles for The New York Times

seattle.jpg

SeattleJason Redmond/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images

phoenix-tc.jpg

PhoenixCaitlin O’Hara for The New York Times

denver.jpg

DenverJason Connolly/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images

oakland.jpg

Oakland, Calif.Jim Wilson/The New York Times

pittsburgh.jpg

PittsburghLake Fong/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette via Associated Press

boise-tc.jpg

Boise, Id.Darin Oswald/Idaho Statesman via Associated Press

stpaul1.jpg

St. PaulDavid Joles/Star Tribune via Associated Press

sioux-falls-TC.jpg

Sioux Falls, S.D.Joe Ahlquist/The Argus Leader via Associated Press

columbia-SC-TC.jpg

Columbia, S.C.Sean Rayford/Getty Images

parkcity.jpg

Park City, UtahAlberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images

concord-nh.jpg

Concord, N.H.Elizabeth Frantz/The Concord Monitor via Associated Press

nashville1.jpg

NashvilleAndrew Nelles/The Tennessean via Associated Press

springfield_mo.jpg

Springfield, Mo.Guillermo Hernandez Martinez/The Springfield News-Leader via Associated Press

portland.jpg

Portland, Ore.Beth Nakamura/The Oregonian via Associated Press

hartford.jpg

Hartford, Conn.Jessica Hill/Associated Press

savannah.jpg

Savannah, Ga.Josh Galemore/Savannah Morning News via Associated Press

lasvegas.jpg

Las VegasJohn Locher/Associated Press

oklahomacity.jpg

Oklahoma CityJim Beckel/The Oklahoman via Associated Press

santafe.jpg

Santa Fe, N.M.Clyde Mueller/Santa Fe New Mexican via Associated Press

jacksonville.jpg

Jacksonville, Fla.ob Mack/The Florida Times-Union via Associated Press

charlotte.jpg

Charlotte, N.C.Diedra Laird/The Charlotte Observer via Associated Press

neworleans.jpg

New Orleans, La.Max Becherer/Associated Press

montpelier.jpg

Montpelier, Vt.Lisa Rathke/Associated Press

salem.jpg

Salem, Ore.Anna Reed/Statesman-Journal, via Associated Press

cleveland.jpg

ClevelandThomas Ondrey/The Plain Dealer via Associated Press

eugene.jpg

Eugene, Ore.Collin Andrew/The Register-Guard via Associated Press

madison.jpg

Madison, Wisc.Amber Arnold/Wisconsin State Journal via Associated Press

knoxville.jpg

Knoxville, Tenn.Caitie Mcmekin/Knoxville News Sentinel via Associated Press

astoria.jpg

Astoria, Ore.Danny Miller/Daily Astorian via Associated Press

indianapolis.jpg

IndianapolisMykal Mceldowney/The Indianapolis Star, via Associated Press

stlouis.jpg

St. LouisJeff Roberson/Associated Press

cheyenne.jpg

Cheyenne, Wyo.Blaine Mccartney/The Wyoming Tribune Eagle via Associated Press

lincoln.jpg

Lincoln, Ne.Jake Crandall/The Journal-Star via Associated Press

lansing.jpg

Lansing, Mich.Samantha Madar/Jackson Citizen Patriot via Associated Press

memphis.jpg

MemphisJim Weber/The Commercial Appeal, via Associated Press

athensga.jpg

Athens, Ga.John Roark/Athens Banner-Herald via Associated Press

richlandwa.jpg

Richland, Wash.Sarah Gordon/The Tri-City Herald via Associated Press

colosprings.jpg

Colorado SpringsChristian Murdock/The Gazette via Associated Press

dallas.jpg

DallasSmiley N. Pool/The Dallas Morning News via Associated Press)

lascruces.jpg

Las Cruces, N.M.Josh Bachman/The Las Cruces Sun-News via Associated Press

midlandmich.jpg

Midland, Mich.Heather Khalifa/The Saginaw News via Associated Press

maui.jpg

Kahului, HawaiiMatthew Thayer/The News via Associated Press

chattanooga1.jpg

Chattanooga, Tenn.Doug Strickland/Chattanooga Times Free Press via Associated Press

guam.jpg

GuamNancy Borowick for The New York Times

flagstaff.jpg

Flagstaff, Ariz.Halie Chavez for The New York Times

amsterdam.jpg

AmsterdamDean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images

athens.jpg

AthensAlexandros Vlachos/European Pressphoto Agency

AUSTRALIA_New_South_Wales.jpg

Sydney, AustraliaDan Himbrechts/European Pressphoto Agency

barcelona-tc.jpg

Barcelona, SpainDavid Ramos/Getty Images

florence.jpg

Florence, ItalyMaurizio Degl’ Innocenti/European Pressphoto Agency

london2.jpg

LondonTim Ireland/Associated Press

madrid.jpg

MadridJavier Barbancho/Reuters

marseilles.jpg

Marseille, FranceBoris Horvat/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images

osloToned2.jpg

OsloNtb Scanpix/Reuters

paris1.jpg

ParisEric Feferberg/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images

prague.jpg

PragueMartin Divisek/European Pressphoto Agency

rome.jpg

RomeMaurizio Brambatti/European Pressphoto Agency

stockholm.jpg

StockholmPontus Lundahl/TT NEWS AGENCY via Associated Press

SOUTH_AFRICA_Capetown.jpg

Cape TownNic Bothma/European Pressphoto Agency

toronto.jpg

TorontoFrank Gunn/The Canadian Press via Associated Press

tbilisi.jpg

Tbilisi, GeorgiaVano Shlamov/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images

nairobi.jpg

Nairobi, KenyaThomas Mukoya/Reuters

helsinki.jpg

Helsinki, FinlandJussi Nukari/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images

wellington.jpg

Wellington, New ZealandReuters

accra.jpg

Accra, GhanaCristina Aldehuela/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images

dublin1.jpg

DublinClodagh Kilcoyne/Reuters

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Tel AvivAmir Cohen/Reuters

auckland.jpg

Auckland, New ZealandFiona Goodall/Getty Images

lisbon.jpg

LisbonPatricia De Melo Moreira/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images

geneva.jpg

Geneva, SwitzerlandSalvatore Di Nolfi/European Pressphoto Agency

bangkok.jpg

BangkokDiego Azubel/European Pressphoto Agency

montreal.jpg

MontrealGraham Hughes/The Canadian Press via Associated Press

mexicocity.jpg

Mexico CityEduardo Verdugo/Associated Press

bogota.jpg

Bogota, ColombiaLeonardo Muñoz/European Pressphoto Agency

sanjose_cr.jpg

San Jose, Costa RicaEzequiel Becerra/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images

vancouver.jpg

Vancouver, CanadaDarryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via Associated Press

erbil.jpg

Erbil, IraqKhalid Mohammed/Associated Press

buenosaires.jpg

Buenos AiresAgustin Marcarian/Associated Press

halifax.jpg

Halifax, CanadaDarren Calabrese/The Canadian Press via Associated Press

brasilia.jpg

Brasilia, BrazilJoédson Alves/European Pressphoto Agency

antarctica.jpg

AntarcticaCourtesy of Linda Zunas

ajijicmx.jpg

Ajijic, MexicoHector Guerrero/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images

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Pictures From Women’s
Marches Around the World
Crowds in hundreds of cities around the world are
gathering Saturday in conjunction with the Women’s
March on Washington. We’ll be adding new photographs
as we get them throughout the day. JAN. 21, 2017
LIVE COVERAGE 360 VIDEO MAPS
washington-overall-TC.jpg
WashingtonChang Lee/The New York Times
new-york1.jpg
New York CityNicole Craine for The New York Times
chicago-tc.jpg
ChicagoJohn J. Kim/Chicago Tribune via Associated Press
los-angeles-TC.jpg
Los AngelesJae C. Hong/Associated Press
Philadelphia.jpg
PhiladelphiaJacqueline Larma/Associated Press
boston2.jpg
BostonJohn T. Lumacki/The Boston Globe via Associated Press
sanfran.jpg
San FranciscoJim Wilson/The New York Times
atlanta-new-TC.jpg
AtlantaKevin D. Liles for The New York Times
seattle.jpg
SeattleJason Redmond/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images

phoenix-tc.jpg
PhoenixCaitlin O’Hara for The New York Times
denver.jpg
DenverJason Connolly/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images
oakland.jpg
Oakland, Calif.Jim Wilson/The New York Times
pittsburgh.jpg
PittsburghLake Fong/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette via Associated Press
boise-tc.jpg
Boise, Id.Darin Oswald/Idaho Statesman via Associated Press
stpaul1.jpg
St. PaulDavid Joles/Star Tribune via Associated Press
sioux-falls-TC.jpg
Sioux Falls, S.D.Joe Ahlquist/The Argus Leader via Associated Press
columbia-SC-TC.jpg
Columbia, S.C.Sean Rayford/Getty Images

parkcity.jpg
Park City, UtahAlberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images
concord-nh.jpg
Concord, N.H.Elizabeth Frantz/The Concord Monitor via Associated Press
nashville1.jpg
NashvilleAndrew Nelles/The Tennessean via Associated Press
springfield_mo.jpg
Springfield, Mo.Guillermo Hernandez Martinez/The Springfield News-Leader via Associated Press
portland.jpg
Portland, Ore.Beth Nakamura/The Oregonian via Associated Press
hartford.jpg
Hartford, Conn.Jessica Hill/Associated Press
savannah.jpg
Savannah, Ga.Josh Galemore/Savannah Morning News via Associated Press
lasvegas.jpg
Las VegasJohn Locher/Associated Press

oklahomacity.jpg
Oklahoma CityJim Beckel/The Oklahoman via Associated Press
santafe.jpg
Santa Fe, N.M.Clyde Mueller/Santa Fe New Mexican via Associated Press
jacksonville.jpg
Jacksonville, Fla.ob Mack/The Florida Times-Union via Associated Press
charlotte.jpg
Charlotte, N.C. Diedra Laird/The Charlotte Observer via Associated Press
neworleans.jpg
New Orleans, La.Max Becherer/Associated Press
montpelier.jpg
Montpelier, Vt.Lisa Rathke/Associated Press
salem.jpg
Salem, Ore.Anna Reed/Statesman-Journal, via Associated Press
cleveland.jpg
ClevelandThomas Ondrey/The Plain Dealer via Associated Press

eugene.jpg
Eugene, Ore.Collin Andrew/The Register-Guard via Associated Press
madison.jpg
Madison, Wisc.Amber Arnold/Wisconsin State Journal via Associated Press
knoxville.jpg
Knoxville, Tenn.Caitie Mcmekin/Knoxville News Sentinel via Associated Press
astoria.jpg
Astoria, Ore.Danny Miller/Daily Astorian via Associated Press
indianapolis.jpg
IndianapolisMykal Mceldowney/The Indianapolis Star, via Associated Press
stlouis.jpg
St. LouisJeff Roberson/Associated Press
cheyenne.jpg
Cheyenne, Wyo.Blaine Mccartney/The Wyoming Tribune Eagle via Associated Press
lincoln.jpg
Lincoln, Ne.Jake Crandall/The Journal-Star via Associated Press

lansing.jpg
Lansing, Mich.Samantha Madar/Jackson Citizen Patriot via Associated Press
memphis.jpg
MemphisJim Weber/The Commercial Appeal, via Associated Press
athensga.jpg
Athens, Ga.John Roark/Athens Banner-Herald via Associated Press
richlandwa.jpg
Richland, Wash.Sarah Gordon/The Tri-City Herald via Associated Press
colosprings.jpg
Colorado SpringsChristian Murdock/The Gazette via Associated Press
dallas.jpg
DallasSmiley N. Pool/The Dallas Morning News via Associated Press)
lascruces.jpg
Las Cruces, N.M.Josh Bachman/The Las Cruces Sun-News via Associated Press
midlandmich.jpg
Midland, Mich.Heather Khalifa/The Saginaw News via Associated Press

maui.jpg
Kahului, HawaiiMatthew Thayer/The News via Associated Press
chattanooga1.jpg
Chattanooga, Tenn.Doug Strickland/Chattanooga Times Free Press via Associated Press
guam.jpg
GuamNancy Borowick for The New York Times
flagstaff.jpg
Flagstaff, Ariz.Halie Chavez for The New York Times
amsterdam.jpg
AmsterdamDean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images
athens.jpg
AthensAlexandros Vlachos/European Pressphoto Agency
AUSTRALIA_New_South_Wales.jpg
Sydney, AustraliaDan Himbrechts/European Pressphoto Agency
barcelona-tc.jpg
Barcelona, SpainDavid Ramos/Getty Images

florence.jpg
Florence, ItalyMaurizio Degl’ Innocenti/European Pressphoto Agency
london2.jpg
LondonTim Ireland/Associated Press
madrid.jpg
MadridJavier Barbancho/Reuters
marseilles.jpg
Marseille, FranceBoris Horvat/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images
osloToned2.jpg
OsloNtb Scanpix/Reuters
paris1.jpg
ParisEric Feferberg/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images
prague.jpg
PragueMartin Divisek/European Pressphoto Agency
rome.jpg
RomeMaurizio Brambatti/European Pressphoto Agency

stockholm.jpg
StockholmPontus Lundahl/TT NEWS AGENCY via Associated Press
SOUTH_AFRICA_Capetown.jpg
Cape TownNic Bothma/European Pressphoto Agency
toronto.jpg
TorontoFrank Gunn/The Canadian Press via Associated Press
tbilisi.jpg
Tbilisi, GeorgiaVano Shlamov/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images
nairobi.jpg
Nairobi, KenyaThomas Mukoya/Reuters
helsinki.jpg
Helsinki, FinlandJussi Nukari/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images
wellington.jpg
Wellington, New ZealandReuters
accra.jpg
Accra, GhanaCristina Aldehuela/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images

dublin1.jpg
DublinClodagh Kilcoyne/Reuters
telaviv.jpg
Tel AvivAmir Cohen/Reuters
auckland.jpg
Auckland, New ZealandFiona Goodall/Getty Images
lisbon.jpg
LisbonPatricia De Melo Moreira/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images
geneva.jpg
Geneva, SwitzerlandSalvatore Di Nolfi/European Pressphoto Agency
bangkok.jpg
BangkokDiego Azubel/European Pressphoto Agency
montreal.jpg
MontrealGraham Hughes/The Canadian Press via Associated Press
mexicocity.jpg
Mexico CityEduardo Verdugo/Associated Press

bogota.jpg
Bogota, ColombiaLeonardo Muñoz/European Pressphoto Agency
sanjose_cr.jpg
San Jose, Costa RicaEzequiel Becerra/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images
vancouver.jpg
Vancouver, CanadaDarryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via Associated Press
erbil.jpg
Erbil, IraqKhalid Mohammed/Associated Press
buenosaires.jpg
Buenos AiresAgustin Marcarian/Associated Press
halifax.jpg
Halifax, CanadaDarren Calabrese/The Canadian Press via Associated Press
brasilia.jpg
Brasilia, BrazilJoédson Alves/European Pressphoto Agency
antarctica.jpg
AntarcticaCourtesy of Linda Zunas

ajijicmx.jpg
Ajijic, MexicoHector Guerrero/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images
By TANNER CURTIS, TROY GRIGGS, MORRIGAN McCARTHY, ALICIA PARLAPIANO, JUGAL K. PATEL, KIERSTEN SCHMIDT, TIM WALLACE and JOE WARD

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‘We’re Not Going Away’: Huge Crowds for Women’s Marches Against Trump‘We’re Not Going Away’: Huge Crowds for Women’s Marches Against Trump JAN. 21, 2017
In Solidarity: Women’s Marches Across the WorldIn Solidarity: Women’s Marches Across the World JAN. 21, 2017
How Marches in Washington Have Shaped AmericaHow Marches in Washington Have Shaped America JAN. 21, 2017
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Retail Customer Experience

January 20, 2017 Leave a comment

 

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