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FRĒDA SALVADOR Holds Fall 2014 LAUNCH EVENT + POP UP SHOP WITH CRIMSON MIM

August 19, 2014 Leave a comment
   
 FRĒDA SALVADOR      FRĒDA SALVADOR      FRĒDA SALVADOR      FRĒDA SALVADOR      FRĒDA SALVADOR

The Ultimate Guide to Wearing a Chambray Shirt

January 14, 2014 Leave a comment

UPDATE (Feb 27 2013): If you like this article – you should ‘Like’ Confessions of a Product Junkie’s brand new Facebook page to get updates when there are more fashion how to’s and articles like this one.

Chambray and denim shirts have been popular for quite a few seasons now, and for good reason. They are, hands down, one of the easiest trends to wear. They’re also the glue that ties many other spring trends together (as you’ll see in this guide).

Personally, I’m a huge fan of the chambray. Some of my favorites are from J Crew (I have this one), Lauren by RL and Urban Outfitters.

More options…

However, I’m sad to see that many women have avoided purchasing a chambray because they’re just not sure how to wear them. That’s where I come in. Because one of the questions I get asked most often is how to pull off the chambray (or I get asked how to wear other things and the answer is always “with a chambray!”), I decided it was time to put together a guide. So here are my tips for wearing a chambray or denim shirt. Enjoy!

Image on left via See Jane. Image on right is me.

So if you add one thing to your wardrobe this spring, make it a chambray or denim shirt. In fact, make it two – because if you follow these tips for wearing yours, you’ll get so much use out of it that you’ll want to own both.

UPDATE (Feb 27 2013): If you like this article – you should ‘Like’ Confessions of a Product Junkie’s brand new Facebook page to get updates when there are more fashion how to’s and articles like this one.

You might also like:

Dress it up a little

10 of-the-moment styles and how to wear them

10 Ways to Wear Jeans and a T-Shirt
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The Sweet Spot: Why Netflix Matters

July 26, 2013 Leave a comment

Incorporating Artlandia SymmertyWorks/SymmetryMill into an Adobe Pattern Design for Industry Course

September 29, 2012 Leave a comment

The Adobe Pattern Design for Industry class offered by the Fashion Textile Technology program at Buffalo State college has undergone continual revisions and modifications over the years. When I first started teaching it we did not use computers. We made a book of fabric swatches with different surface treatments [pen/paint/dye etc; marbling rubber stamp, stenciling, rubber cement, etc] We also hand drew motifs and developed repeats using tracing paper and the light table and carefully taped together copies before we transferred the repeat design to good paper for painting.

Everything took so long not much was developed for student portfolios in 15 weeks of class that we have. I slowly started transferring time-consuming steps to the computer starting with scanning in the hand drawn motifs so that the hand drawn motif could be developed into a seamless repeat on the computer. The single repeat was printed out and traced on to paper to be hand painted. This handpainted single repeat would then have to be scanned in and color separated – lots of time again.

I thought we could save a lot more time if we scanned in individual handpainted motifs or elements like individual flowers, color separated them in Photoshop and maybe duplicated and arranged a motif and repeat design once they were already separated. This saved lots of time and more student assignments could be completed for this class. At this point the major portion of the class was shifting to Photoshop and Illustrator, we no longer worked on the book of fabric swatches. Students take a fiber design course to develop traditional printing, multi-media or weaving techniques.

Currently the class is focusing primarily on Illustrator because it really speeds things up in a major way. The final files are much smaller and all elements created in this resolution free vector environment can easily be archived and used for other projects, or can be imported into a raster program like Photoshop at any size and resolution.

Having the students working on increasing Illustrator skills also reflects the graphics infusion with surface design trends that are everywhere to be seen in commercial fabrics. A quick review of the fabrics in the SS13 NY and London ready-to-wear designer collections will verify this observation. We do continue to use Photoshop for concept board development to instruct students how to use a variety of special effects and layer masks. We also have a color separation and cleaning and recoloring assignment to instruct students how they would color separate, clean and recolor hand painted artwork.

Students from the fiber design class are encouraged to either scan in or take a digital photograph of their original work so they can learn how to make a seamless repeat and recolor a tonal image [as well as a photograph] in Photoshop. This semester the addition of Artlandia SymmetryMill to expand on this assignment is sure to excite the students. SymmetryMill is the perfect application to develop the current pattern patch work type designs that include multiple different pattern repeats for one fabric using one overall color palette in different proportions for each pattern repeat.

Artlandia SymmetryMill is a stand-alone full function Web Browser application, all you need is an Internet connection.

Another place we make be able to make use of SymmetryMill is in an assignment were we start with a scanned image of a water-color flower, we desaturate it, create a repeat and develop multiple custom colorways for it.

We have also recently incorporated the new Adobe CS6 Pattern Tool into the course assignments. Here is a link to a previous post (Adobe Illustrator CS6: New Pattern Tool Video Tutorials) that has some video tutorials of the new Pattern Tool. During the last 4-5 classes of the semester, students will first be introduced to using Artlandia SymmetryWorks in Illustrator then they will take the Illustrator motifs they have already developed earlier in the class and create SymmetryWorks layouts that will include the original motif and 6 repeat tiles and in repeat swatches that they developed from each motif using Symmetry Works. Artlandia SymmetryWorks has been around for a while. The SymmetryWorks application is continually being upgraded to enable the user to develop more sophisticated and complex vector [and raster] patterning.

The Artlandia SymmetryMill and Artlandia SymmetryWorks applications are excellent additions to the Adobe Surface Design for Industry class. These applications enable students to create an unlimited number of tonal and vector repeats in a very short time. The different symmetries also help students understand the interlocking repeat construction of the repeats. The new SymmetryMill in particular is excellent for an educational setting because students can work right from their Web browsers (see image above), no other application is needed to develop the pattern repeats. Students can work on assignments from anywhere they have an Internet connection.

You may wonder how I learned about Artlandia SymmetryMill. I was recently invited to beta test it and I must say it is totally addictive for anyone that loves to create and develop and endless variety of repeat seamless patterns. You can upload your custom image and very quickly develop repeat patterns from seventeen planar symmetry types.

You can learn about:

SymmetryMill HERE.

SymmetryWorks HERE.

You can keep your patterns private or share them with the community at Pattern Central.

Here is the link to the SymmertyMill patterns I developed while beta testing the product for Artlandia. SymmetryMill has step-by-step tutorials HERE.

SymmetryWorks has excellent easy to follow step-by-step tutorials. Below are some images of the patterns developed from following their tutorials.

Artlandia has even developed a pattern glossary that the students can easily refer to learn about the different pattern terms and categories.

The students at Buffalo State are looking forward to working on Artlandia SymmetryMill[raster] and Artlandia SymmetryWorks [vector] this semester.

I will post again about integrating the Artlandia SynmmetryMill and SymmetryWorks applications in my course after the semester ends.

The full assortment of Artlandia products are HERE.

Demand Manufacturing: AM4U (Apparel Made 4 You)

August 14, 2012 9 comments

“Demand Manufacturing” what is it? Just as it states, it directly connects consumers’ demand to manufacturing. The AM4U (Apparel Made 4 You) concept represents the set-up of turnkey purchase activated manufacture (PAM) mini-factories in the USA for making and selling active performance apparel online. With this method the need for all finished goods inventory will be eliminated. Mini plants can be placed inside a distribution site or near a shopping hub and can be easily moved on two trucks.

Bud Robinson is Chief Marketing Officer of Critical Mass Manufacturing Inc, (CMM) which is the leading member of a group of apparel industry advisors to Cal Poly Pomona’s Department of Apparel Merchandising and Management (AMM). Dr. Peter Kilduff, Chair of AMM has assembled a team to demonstrate a revolutionary new way to manufacture and market Active Apparel. “Bud’s Apparel background includes: President of Levi Strauss International, and President of Hang Ten and Catalina Swimwear, he was also EVP of the Gap Stores and was instrumental in their startup. Bud is coordinating the AMM advisory group that has incorporated itself as AM4U.

Bill Grier is a pioneer in the digital printing industry and he is also the inventor of numerous international and US patents. Bill is the founder and current chief technology officer (CEO) of Critical Mass Manufacturing (CMM). For the AMM demonstration project that Bud recently coordinated, Bill teamed up with Styku virtual body-scanning, Tukatech Apparel Technology, AIMS apparel management system and Eton Systems to launch an initial demand manufacturing AM4U prototype project aimed at illustrating how consumers can be  directly connected to manufacturing to create the demand manufacturing process.

After listening to Bill speak so eloquently about the AM4U demand manufacturing mini manufacturing modules he would like to see set-up across the US, I decided that you should have an opportunity to listen to him talk more in detail about the historical background of how numerous developments in technology have come together to create a “perfect storm of opportunity and transformation for the American apparel industry.”

Bill Grier

Audio interview here – please listen to Bill’s historical background story.

 Bill details the historical background:

  • On the confluence of bar codes, digital printing, fiber development, environmental awareness, the DAMA Project,overseas manufacturing, custom body scanning and the Internet, which presented this unique opportunity for change.
  • Zero Inventory Production (ZIP).
  • Technology Advantages. incorporated into AM4U digital printing.
  • Critical Mass Manufacturing (CMM).
  • Purchase activated Manufacturing.

Dr. Peter Kilduff

The companies initially came together with Cal Poly Pomona’s Apparel Merchandising and Management department to work on the project, hoping to find a solution to waste and overproduction in the apparel industry.

The video clip below represents the initial demonstration of the AM4U solution. AM4U’s mentor Dr Peter Kilduff, chair of Cal Poly’s Apparel Merchandising and Management department (AMM) explains one of the major problems plaguing American manufacturing. He introduces how AM4U technology has the capacity to change the apparel industry from supply and demand to demand and supply.

Critical Mass Manufacturing: Cost Effective Demand to Supply Green Technology

When I spoke to Bill Grier about this green cost-effective demand and supply technology he spoke passionately of his dream to bring the industrial base in textiles back to the U.S. by doing demand manufacturing.” Bill went on to say that “The Internet is not about price it’s about choice. Our purpose is to make the technology or products available to people who need them on a wider scale.  The AM4U concept represents a huge shift for the apparel industry. It’s switching supply and demand to demand and supply.”

CMM has developed the Active Tunnel Coloration (ATC) process (patent pending) that replaces huge water-based dye houses. No water or hazardous chemicals are used.This represents a green technology with no use of chemicals.

Bill states:

–  that the colors produced by his method are so permanent that you could pour bleach on it and the colors will never change. Cleaning agents or bleach cannot affect the coloration of the fabric, resulting in the most durable colored fabrics available. Since water is eliminated in the AM4U color application process, production is simplified.

This technology allows color changes on the fly, any colors and different colors for each garment, that includes all over prints and graphics. This process will eliminate finished goods inventory and the related carrying costs will increase retained gross profits by up to 100%.

CMM’s technology is devised around a single principle: The fiber itself contains enough energy to conduct colorization from the energy stored in the fiber, rather than requiring external chemicals to create color.

What we found is that there was energy stored in the fiber when it was formed that we could trigger to move dye into the fiber.

Most fabric coloring requires mass production through multiple processes and factories, which often results in excess fabric from over-estimating production. This technology enables dying, printing and labeling only the amount of fabric needed, all on one machine in a single pass  and on a much quicker schedule, instead of a designer having to place an order overseas to separate dye houses and printing manufacturers.

Grier’s technology is devised around a single principle: The fiber itself contains enough energy to conduct colorization from the energy stored in the fiber, rather than requiring external chemicals to create color, Grier explained.

“What we found is that there was energy stored in the fiber when it was man-made that we could release at certain frequencies,” Grier said.

Currently, his research has been limited to man-made polymers, such as nylon and polyester.

Beyond the environmental benefits of conserving water, the new technology also helps conserve resources by enabling users to use demand manufacturing, which negates the need for over-production, Grier says.

Most fabric dyeing requires mass production through multiple factories, which often results in excess fabric from over-estimating production, Grier explained. His technology enables him to dye, print and imprint only the amount of fabric needed, all on one machine and on a much quicker schedule, instead of a designer having to place an order overseas to separate dye houses and printing manufacturers, Grier said.

“We’re trying to tie the manufacturing speed directly to consumer takeaway speed. That way, there’s no extra production. We can produce a one-off for the Internet for the same price as mass production,” he said.

Grier said this technology could help bring the textile industry back to the United States instead of relying on large-scale mass printing and production overseas.

“Four out of every five blouses produced overseas is not sold at retail price. That means we’ve produced four blouses more than we need for the marketplace, and the water use is somewhere around 100 to 150 gallons of water per blouse, so if we don’t produce four of them because the technology is closer to the consumer, we’ve saved water and pollution,”  He explained. “Water is becoming a precious commodity, especially in California, and without waterless technology we lose the ability to control our own destiny on the products we produce in California.”

California Apparel News

Top Benefits of AM4U Technology

  • A perfect Fit every time for the consumer.
  • A zero inventory production system.
  • ACT technology save the environment by eliminating the use of billions of gallons of water with no caustic chemicals.
  • Very important is the bottom line – AM4U technology will result in a 40% higher profit and will produce thousands of new jobs.

Higher Education Partnerships Wanted

Bill Grier and Bud Robinson would like to partner with higher education to continue testing AM4U (Apparel Made 4 You) demand manufacturing green technology. At the same time they would like to support higher education by providing an opportunity for schools and students to build funding streams for more student centered research projects. They will provide more details in an upcoming post.

If you can’t wait here is contact information for you:

CLO3D Student Virtual Fashion Collection Projects

 

The student projects posted here represent an optional CLO3D project that was part of a 4 week CLO3D module that was part of an Adobe FashionCAD class. No garment pattern skills or pattern making prerequisites are required for this class. Some apparel design and product development students are mixed in with fashion merchandising, fashion/textile design technology.

CLO3D was used exclusively as a fashion product visualization tool to view the 2D fashion product line concepts they created earlier in the semester in a 3D environment.

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The specific challenge for this optional project was to develop CLO3D virtual representations [6] to match a previous 2D fashion product development class assignment that included concept,description, color, fabric, print pattern and line boards. They were to develop the garments , create CLO3D layouts illustrating different viewpoints and a CLO3D animation for each garment.

Examples of other  student virtual fashion collection projects:

Cara Walsemann: The Flow of Nature Collection

Ebenezer Baawuah: Earthlistic Collection

Previous CLO3D post: CLO3D Student Virtual Fashion Concept Visualization Project

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

CLO3D Student Virtual Fashion Concept Visualization Project

The video above is an example of Introduction to CLO3D to a FashionCAD class that focuses on developing  intermediate Adobe skills for the Fashion Industry. Each semester we try to include one big final project that has the potential to incorporate some of the previous skills as well as introduce a 3D working environment to students. The students in this class are not exclusively apparel design students. Some apparel design and product development students are mixed in with fashion merchandising, fashion/textile design technology. No garment pattern skills or background are required for this class.

The video below has additional submissions.

Introducing CLO3D was an experiment conducted to determine how user-friendly and easy CLO3D would be in a general fashion Adobe design product development class as a fashion product visualization tool. The results were outstanding.  The videos posted are the result of the very first CLO3D class assignments. Each student watched the CLO3D  intro video tutorials and they were each assigned to develop 3 garments. They were to use fashion colors developed in class and if they used print patterns – they should be the ones developed earlier in class.

These first assignment videos illustrate partial results from the class.

Once the students familiarized themselves with the basic functions they began to really see the creative development possibilities and really began to enjoy working in CLO3D. This was a user-friendly application that they could use to quickly visualize their fashion product concept.

CLO3D was not used as a garment pattern making tool in this class – it was used exclusively as a fashion product visualization tool to view their 2D fashion concepts in a 3D environment. The time alloted for the CLO3D project was the last 4 weeks out of a 15 week semester.

The students were then challenged to an optional project to develop CLO3D virtual representations [6] to match a previous fashion product development class assignment that included concept,description, color, fabric, print pattern and line boards. Future posts will illustrate some of the student submissions.

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

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