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The Ultimate Guide to Wearing a Chambray Shirt

January 14, 2014 Leave a comment

UPDATE (Feb 27 2013): If you like this article – you should ‘Like’ Confessions of a Product Junkie’s brand new Facebook page to get updates when there are more fashion how to’s and articles like this one.

Chambray and denim shirts have been popular for quite a few seasons now, and for good reason. They are, hands down, one of the easiest trends to wear. They’re also the glue that ties many other spring trends together (as you’ll see in this guide).

Personally, I’m a huge fan of the chambray. Some of my favorites are from J Crew (I have this one), Lauren by RL and Urban Outfitters.

More options…

However, I’m sad to see that many women have avoided purchasing a chambray because they’re just not sure how to wear them. That’s where I come in. Because one of the questions I get asked most often is how to pull off the chambray (or I get asked how to wear other things and the answer is always “with a chambray!”), I decided it was time to put together a guide. So here are my tips for wearing a chambray or denim shirt. Enjoy!

Image on left via See Jane. Image on right is me.

So if you add one thing to your wardrobe this spring, make it a chambray or denim shirt. In fact, make it two – because if you follow these tips for wearing yours, you’ll get so much use out of it that you’ll want to own both.

UPDATE (Feb 27 2013): If you like this article – you should ‘Like’ Confessions of a Product Junkie’s brand new Facebook page to get updates when there are more fashion how to’s and articles like this one.

You might also like:

Dress it up a little

10 of-the-moment styles and how to wear them

10 Ways to Wear Jeans and a T-Shirt
Categories: avatar, Blogroll, Bodyscanning, BSCRUNWAY, Digital Fashion, Fashion Education, Fashion in Second Life, Fashion Project, Fashion Technology, IFFTI, Mass Customization, MCPC 2007, NMC 2007, NMC Symposium on Creativity in SL 2007, OpenSim, Optitex, Professor, RUNWAY, RUNWAY 2.0, Runway 3.0, Second Life, Second Life BLogs, SLCCedu07, TC2, Technology, Uncategorized, Virtual Fashion, Virtual Fashion Branding, Virtual Fashion Marketing, Virtual Fashion PRO, Virtual Fashion Student Blogs, Virtual World Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

CLO3D Student Virtual Fashion Concept Visualization Project

The video above is an example of Introduction to CLO3D to a FashionCAD class that focuses on developing  intermediate Adobe skills for the Fashion Industry. Each semester we try to include one big final project that has the potential to incorporate some of the previous skills as well as introduce a 3D working environment to students. The students in this class are not exclusively apparel design students. Some apparel design and product development students are mixed in with fashion merchandising, fashion/textile design technology. No garment pattern skills or background are required for this class.

The video below has additional submissions.

Introducing CLO3D was an experiment conducted to determine how user-friendly and easy CLO3D would be in a general fashion Adobe design product development class as a fashion product visualization tool. The results were outstanding.  The videos posted are the result of the very first CLO3D class assignments. Each student watched the CLO3D  intro video tutorials and they were each assigned to develop 3 garments. They were to use fashion colors developed in class and if they used print patterns – they should be the ones developed earlier in class.

These first assignment videos illustrate partial results from the class.

Once the students familiarized themselves with the basic functions they began to really see the creative development possibilities and really began to enjoy working in CLO3D. This was a user-friendly application that they could use to quickly visualize their fashion product concept.

CLO3D was not used as a garment pattern making tool in this class – it was used exclusively as a fashion product visualization tool to view their 2D fashion concepts in a 3D environment. The time alloted for the CLO3D project was the last 4 weeks out of a 15 week semester.

The students were then challenged to an optional project to develop CLO3D virtual representations [6] to match a previous fashion product development class assignment that included concept,description, color, fabric, print pattern and line boards. Future posts will illustrate some of the student submissions.

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

Digital Fabric Design: Creative & Technical Exploration

Using CLO3D to visualize engineered garments

This post summarizes a customized undergraduate student project that incorporated an exploration into and experimental development of vector based surface design graphics. The new methods explored by the student were non-repeat yardage & engineered garment design.

The aesthetic goal of this project is to capture the essence of Hawaii. Water life, flora, and volcanoes of Hawaii are incorporated into the surface designs. Research was conducted to integrate the surface theme with the traditional sarong garment styling as well as develop engineered garments inspired by the sarong.

Faith Scheffer Moeuhane-Fabric-Design-II

The challenge was to first conduct a variety of research then develop a Hawaiian theme that is integrated with current color and print trends. A new method of print design for the student involved four very large lengths of silk fabric (four sarongs)  that did not contain a repeat. Another challenge was to explore and develop custom engineered prints for garment pattern design and construction. Garment patterns were traditionally developed and digitized into the OptTtex application. From there they were exported and then imported into Adobe Illustrator where the surface graphics were added. CLO3D was used as a 3D visualization aid for viewing surface graphic design placement.

Vector based applications are perfect for creation of either large width/length pieces of yardage or for developing graphics for full-scale garment patterns because vector files are resolution free thus the file sizes are manageable as compared to raster files. Vector files can be easily exported as a raster of any quality.

The wide scale  (42″ by 72″) fabric non-repeat design was easily created by the student in Adobe Illustrator. The silk fabric yardage was printed at Inkdrop Printing. Garment patterns for this project were  created using the traditional methods of flat patternmaking and then patterns are digitized into the computer. The full-scale garment patterns were then imported into Adobe Illustrator and surface designs were created directly onto the garments patterns. 3D visualization helps with design development. Fabric was digitally printed with the digitally embellished surface patterns at Spoonflower. The two garments are then constructed.

The resulting Moe’uhane, (which means “dream” in Hawaiian) collection consists of four sarong yardages and two Hawaiian-inspired garments. They were recently presented publicly at the BSCRUNWAY 5.0 annual fashion event sponsored by the Fashion and Textile Technology Program at Buffalo State College, USA.

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Link to Faith Scheffer student designer interview

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua VII

– Summary

Flamingo Pua Collection

The Flamingo Pua project involved the design, development and creation of prototypes of a collection of 6 garments from initial concept to virtual to real garment prototypes.

The use of 2D and 3D applications throughout enables very quick response design development. This project took approximately 3 weeks from start to finish. Applications used were Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator, OptiTex, and CLO 3D.

Photoshop was used to develop the initial concept board, Illustrator was used to develop print pattern repeats and create the garment basic silhouettes, silhouettes with print patterns and all full size garment pattern surface design and graphics.

OptiTex is a very easy to use multi-dimensional application. For this project it was used for garment pattern development, initial 3D garment testing before and after graphics were applied, and export of garment patterns to Illustrator.

CLO3D was used to develop Animations for the virtual fashion show and the four-way layouts.

The four-way static posed layouts could also easily be generated in the OptiTex application.

Other product development steps you would need to complete if you were ever planning on some sort of limited production would be to create a specification pack [spec pack or tech pack] that included all detailed  garment measurements for each size you are planning to order the garment in and every single other material [fashion fabric/lining, interfacing], notion and embellishment needed to reconstruct the garment. Last but not least by any means would be to put together a costing sheet that includes all costs associated with producing the item. I will put together a follow-up post in near future.

Hope you enjoyed the series.

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

Previous posts:

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua VI: – Runway

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua V: – digital fabric printing of engineered garment pattern prototypes.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua IV: CLO3D virtual fashion show

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua III: garment pattern development in OptiTex, garment sketch development, engineered garment pattern surface design development, OptiTex 3D simulation test.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua II: color palette, print pattern and garment sketch development.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua I: inspiration, initial research for concept & silhouette development

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua VI

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A very special thank you to Kristina, Kadejah and Ashley.

BSCRUNWAY 5.0 was held at Pierce Arrow Building on Saturday April 21st at 3 and 8pm. Here is a link to the BSCRUNWAY FACEBOOK page and the BSCRUNWAY blog.

 

The Flamingo Pua collection was in Runway 5.0. Video of the entire show will soon be on the Buffalo State YouTube site and a video clip of just the Flamingo Pua collection will be posted here when it is ready.

  • Nate Benson Photo links for Runway 5.0 here.
  • Eric Winton Photography Runway 5.0 link here.
  • Buffalo.com photo links for Runway 5.0 here.

Next Post: 2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua VII: Summary

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

Previous posts:

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua V: – digital fabric printing of engineered garment pattern prototypes.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua IV: CLO3D virtual fashion show

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua III: garment pattern development in OptiTex, garment sketch development, engineered garment pattern surface design development, OptiTex 3D simulation test.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua II: color palette, print pattern and garment sketch development.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua I: inspiration, initial research for concept & silhouette development

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua V

– digital fabric printing of engineered garment pattern prototypes.

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The Engineered Garment Pattern Prototype Printing Process

The process used for the non-permanent digital textile printing was just an ordinary 42 inch wide HP designjet inkjet printer.

If you would like to send out for a more permanent digital textile printing process there is Inkdrop Printing , First2print , Spoonflower, Fabric on Demand or Karma Kraft.

Here is a link to an interesting article on Spoonflower titled “Made in the Carolinas.”

We did not have time to send these files out for a more permanent printing procedure as the entire process from  virtual start to real world and ready for Runway finish for the 6 garments was three weeks and we do not have a more permanent digital printing system on campus.  Since the garment pattern pieces were printed inside the cut line – it was quite simple to cut out the individual pattern pieces from the printed fabric. The fabric was paper-backed so the paper was pulled off. The 100% cotton jersey was then stabilized with some iron on fusible knit interfacing. The garments were constructed fast because, structurally they were very simple.

The next step was to prepare for the Runway event.

Next post: 2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua VI: Runway

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

Previous posts:

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua IV: CLO3D virtual fashion show

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua III: garment pattern development in OptiTex, garment sketch development, engineered garment pattern surface design development, OptiTex 3D simulation test.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua II: color palette, print pattern and garment sketch development.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua I: inspiration, initial research for concept & silhouette development

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua IV

– CLO3D virtual fashion show

CLO3D was the application used to create a virtual fashion show for the Flamingo Pua series. I will have more posts in the near future relating to integration  testing of the CLO3D application in an educational setting for specialized use as a fashion product visualization tool as well as a student project that included the use of the CLO3D application.

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Next post: 2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua V: digital fabric printing of engineered garment pattern prototypes

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

Previous posts:

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua III: garment pattern development in OptiTex,  garment sketch development, engineered garment pattern surface design development, OptiTex 3D simulation test.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua II: color palette, print pattern and garment sketch development.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua I:  inspiration, initial research for concept & silhouette development

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua III

– Garment pattern development in OptiTex,  garment sketch development, engineered garment pattern surface design development, OptiTex 3D simulation test.

palette, print pattern and garment sketch development.

Garment patterns were quickly developed and simulations were visualized using OptiTex PDS.

Ideas for graphics were added to basic silhouette sketches (above) and used as a guide to develop final surface patterns/graphics (below).

Garment patterns were exported from OptiTex and imported into Adobe Illustrator full size (above).  All garment pattern lines were set to invisible except perimeter cut lines. Graphics and surface patterns were developed inside the cut lines for each full size garment pattern piece.

Engineered garment surface patterns were tested in the OptiTex PDS 3D application (above).

Next post: 2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua IV : Clo3D – virtual fashion show

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

Previous posts:

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua II: color palette, print pattern and garment sketch development.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua I: inspiration, initial research for concept & silhouette development

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua II

– color palette, print pattern and garment sketch development.

 

Color palette, print pattern and garment sketch development Color, styling and silhouette direction were researched using WGSN (Worth Global Styling Network). It is the leading online global trend and sourcing network.

“WGSN is the leading online trend-analysis and research service providing creative and business intelligence for the apparel, style, design and retail industries.” History of WGSN

All WGSN reports are downloadable and fully editable. My favorite category is Design and product Development –   inspiration, influences  research color key items, silhouette, styling and graphics 2 years in advance for every fashion category you can think of.

Pasted blow are the color and print patterns developed for the Flamingo Pua series.

Pasted below are the basic garment silhouette shapes developed for the Flamingo Pua series.

Next Post: 2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua III – Garment pattern development & engineered garment pattern surface design development.

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

Previous post: 2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua I : Inspiration, initial research for concept & silhouette development

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype Flamingo Pua I

This fashion product development product prototype project was specifically developed by Elaine Polvinen, MFA & Dr. Lynn Boorady, Buffalo State College, USA to incorporate a visual exotic Hawaiian theme into a series of real world garments and to experiment and explore integrating multiple 2D and 3D development techniques. Applications used for development of this series were Adobe Creative Suite [Photoshop & Illustrator], OptiTex and CLO3D.

CONCEPT/SILHOUETTE DEVELOPMENT

INSPIRATION

The inspiration for the Flamingo Pua Series is a synthesis of the simplicity and beauty of the anthurium plant. The simplicity of the early Hawaiian holoku and muu’muu garments also provided an additional inspiration for the simple shapes of the 100% cotton jersey garment series.

CONCEPT RESEARCH

The project began with visual research and development of 2D visuals of the anthurium, color, garment silhouette and styling trend research as well as research into the historical  development of the early Hawaiian holoku garment and Hawaiian fashion. According research conducted by Arthur (1997) the hawaiian holoku originated as a loose gown for everyday wear. Her research states twentieth century “Lingerie-style holokeq \o(u,-)  were made in cottons such as muslin, batiste and dimity, and had a straighter silhouette than previously.” The Hawaiian muu’muu was a loose fitting , shorter informal version of the holoku.  The word muu’ muu means “cut off” because it lacked a yoke.

Information about Hawaiian shirts an dresses can be located here and here.

Next post: 2D/3D Fashion Product Development Prototype flamingo Pua II – color palette, print pattern and garment sketch development.

note: If you are an educator and have a 2D/3D apparel/textile product development prototype project that either you or your student(s) created and would like to share with readers of this blog, please contact me at polvinem@buffalostate.edu

copyright © 2012 by Elaine Polvinen all rights reserved.

LUXE Fashion Show at Genesee Community College

April 25, 2010 3 comments

Yesterday I attended the LUXE Fashion Show at Genesee Community College in Batavia, NY. The show directed by Professor Rick Dudkowski is in it’s 29th year. The experience of all the participants in the show annual event  is very obvious from the moment you walk in – everything runs like a seasoned and well oiled production.

It seems that every year the students outdo themselves from the year before. Many different areas of the college participate in the production of the show. The proceeds from the show are used to fund students events. Here is a link to the students in Professor Dudkowski’s class that produce the show. There were 11 scenes and students assumed all production aspects associated with the scene they coordinated. Several scenes had fashion items that were original creations of the students. The first scene in particular has a  Eco-Couture collection created by Brittany Moose and Kayla Palmer.  Brittany will be continuing her professional education as an apparel design student at the Fashion technology Program at Buffalo State College next fall. She is pictured on one of the slides below with Professor Dudkowski.

There was a lovely reception held after the show where light refreshments were served, a raffle was held and various fashion items were for sale. Here is a FLICKR link to some images from the show. Sorry about the image quality but I was sitting several rows back from the runway.

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Here is another link that details the LUXE event by Brittany Baker titled “GCC fashion show set to dazzle.”

A Tribute to My Mentor

Today in the Buffalo News My View column is a tribute to my lifelong mentor – Sister Jeanne File. She was a most amazing person from the moment I first laid eyes on her to the very last time I saw her. I shall be eternally grateful for the privilege of having her in my life.

The title of the column is “Great teacher shared the gift of knowledge

A link to her obituary “Sister Jeanne File, 94, Daemen professor emeritus

Introduction to Fashion Technologies

January 31, 2010 2 comments

Last week was the first week of spring semester, it was also drop/add week at Buffalo State College. Fashion classes are  filled to capacity and all fashion students seem settled in for the semester with their schedules.

I am teaching several sections of Introduction to Fashion Technologies. In this class students all get introductory experiences with MS WORD, Excel, PowerPoint, Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. The goal is for them to attain a comfort level using these off-the-shelf programs for fashion related projects such as introductory employment, customer and trend research and reports, client presentations, product development, costing and specification sheets.

Gaining experience and skills using a variety of widely used off-the-shelf applications will strategically position fashion students for additional directly or indirectly related career path options.

Virtual Fashion Internship Follow-Up Questions

November 21, 2009 5 comments

I would like to include a link to the Bella Fantasique blog that Missy started when her virtual fashion brand concept was developed in the summer of 2009. If you would like to visit Missy’s Bella Fantasique store in Second Life to see all the virtual fashion garments she has developed for yourself here is a SLurl to teleport you there. If you do not want to visit in-world yet but would like to see Missy’s fashions here is a link to her fashion products on the XSTREET Marketplace. You can purchase something there and have it delivered in-world to you or to someone else as a virtual gift.

 After  Missy’s SL Virtual Internship Interview ended and I uploaded the podcast, I thought of some additional questions others may have for Missy regarding this entire virtual internship experience. I sent the questions to Missy and her responses are below.

1. Are your Second Life experiences relavant to any of your fashion education classes? If so in what way? 

My Second Life experiences are related to two fashion classes I have taken at Buffalo State college thus far, FTT208:Introduction to Fashion Technologies and FTT308: FashionCAD. Both are fashion CAD classes, using Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. Once I learned the basics in those two classes, I was able to learn so much more about those programs.
 
2. Do you feel that the experiences that you are simulating in second life regarding developing a brand and coordinated fashion lines, presenting and merchandising your brand integrates and simulates the knowledge and skills that you are learning in your fashion education classes?

If anything else, Second Life inspires me. I am eager to create and design garments and have the ability to change what I am making with a simple click of a button, instead of having to completely redo a sewn garment. I am faster at finding ways to get things done more efficiently in my fashion classes.
 
3. Are your fashion design and merchandising related experiences in Second Life providing you with a clearer  picture of what is involved in the real world design and merchandising process? If so how?

Second Life is making having a fashion line real to me. It’s a fast pace enviroment and putting your ideas into Photoshop and Illustrator and then into Second Life virtually shows an image of what my designs would look like on a body, without the cost of materials and sewing time. I like seeing the progression of sketches to actual garments, and it cuts time so much shorter to see it on a virtual body first to make sure everything looks they way I want it. I also have always had a love for marketing and the business side of fashion, and I get to do this in SL by running my store and modeling. So it’s the best of both worlds… literally. [note from e.polvinen: Missy really does mean this literally because the Lindens $L she makes from selling her virtual fashions are easily converted into $US dollars.]
 
4. Would you recommend a virtual fashion design and merchandising experience to other fashion students?

I absolutely would recommend virtual design to other fashion students because that is where technology is taking us. If we have the programs available, it doesn’t hurt to get familiar with them, in order to make presentations and amazing concept boards. So many things are done now with the computer, so why not make fashion with it too?

From my own experience as a professor teaching fashion students introduction to fashion concepts in Second Life for the last three years, it is an ideal platform for developing unified fashion garment/line /brand concepts,  building presentation skills, organizational skills, fashion terminology, business and marketing skills…and it’s an opportunity to makes real $$$.

Other blog postings related to Missy:

  • Missy’s SL Virtual Internship Interview
  • Missy Lavecchia in Jewels of Winter
  • Missy Lavecchia First Solo Show
  • Bella Fantasique – Midnight Sparkle Collection
  • Missy’s SL Virtual Internship Interview

    November 21, 2009 5 comments

     

    Missy’s Virtual Fashion Internship

    In this Virtual Fashion Internship podcast I am asking Missy questions regarding the virtual internship PowerPoint she submitted to me upon completion of the project. Missy aka: Missy Lavecchia in Second Life  is one of two Buffalo State Fashion Technology students that completed a virtual internship with Shenlei Winkler aka Shenlei Flasheart from the Fashion Research Institute in the summer of 2009. We are viewing the PowerPoint as we are discussing the internship.

    We have been attempting to schedule this interview since September. After multiple postponements we finally managed to complete it in my campus office last Wednesday. I did not even notice the traffic noise in the background [including an ambulance] until after the interview was completed. We were viewing Missy’s PowerPoint as we discussed her reactions to the entire virtual internship experience.

    You will hear in the interview that she developed a concept board for her brand, a color palette for her collection, presentation  boards and packages as well as a customer service policy. Once her collection was completed she participated in a well attended virtual fashion show titled Fluid with two other interns.

    Other blog postings related to Missy:

  • Virtual Fashion Internship Follow-Up Questions
  • Missy Lavecchia in Jewels of Winter
  • Missy Lavecchia First Solo Show
  • Bella Fantasique – Midnight Sparkle Collection
  • Here is a link to The Fluid Fashion show event that was the culmination of the internships for three fashion students.

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